Paleohydrology of pool and riffle pattern development : Boulder Creek, Utah

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191315
Title:
Paleohydrology of pool and riffle pattern development : Boulder Creek, Utah
Author:
O'Connor, Jim E.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The low-flow channel morphology at Boulder Creek is characterized by a well-developed pool-and-riffle pattern. The riffles consist of accumulations of basaltic boulders deposited from upstream source areas during extremely large flows. Paleoflood water-surface profiles defined by highwater indicators such as slackwater sediments and silt lines indicate that discharges of up to 400 ± 50 cms have affected the lower reaches of this stream system. Stratigraphic relationships and archaeologic and radiometric age constraints indicate that at least four large-magnitude, low-frequency flow events have occurred within the last 500 to 1000 radiocarbon years B.P. Step-backwater hydraulic reconstructions of these large flows suggest that the positions of the boulder-comprised riffles are controlled by spatial variations in large-flow stream power. Boulder deposition occurs where channel stream power drops below thresholds necessary for boulder transport. Reaches immediately upstream of canyun bends and constrictions, and downstream of canyon expansions are sites of large-flow stream-power minima. It is in the vicinity of these types of canyon geometries that the low-flow riffles are observed. Comparison of calculated stream power values and measured boulder sizes with established coarse-particle transport relationships indicates that a 400 ans flaw is approximately the minimum discharge that has the competence to affect this pool-and-riffle pattern.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Paleohydrology -- Utah.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Geosciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePaleohydrology of pool and riffle pattern development : Boulder Creek, Utahen_US
dc.creatorO'Connor, Jim E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorO'Connor, Jim E.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe low-flow channel morphology at Boulder Creek is characterized by a well-developed pool-and-riffle pattern. The riffles consist of accumulations of basaltic boulders deposited from upstream source areas during extremely large flows. Paleoflood water-surface profiles defined by highwater indicators such as slackwater sediments and silt lines indicate that discharges of up to 400 ± 50 cms have affected the lower reaches of this stream system. Stratigraphic relationships and archaeologic and radiometric age constraints indicate that at least four large-magnitude, low-frequency flow events have occurred within the last 500 to 1000 radiocarbon years B.P. Step-backwater hydraulic reconstructions of these large flows suggest that the positions of the boulder-comprised riffles are controlled by spatial variations in large-flow stream power. Boulder deposition occurs where channel stream power drops below thresholds necessary for boulder transport. Reaches immediately upstream of canyun bends and constrictions, and downstream of canyon expansions are sites of large-flow stream-power minima. It is in the vicinity of these types of canyon geometries that the low-flow riffles are observed. Comparison of calculated stream power values and measured boulder sizes with established coarse-particle transport relationships indicates that a 400 ans flaw is approximately the minimum discharge that has the competence to affect this pool-and-riffle pattern.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshPaleohydrology -- Utah.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGeosciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.oclc219695004en_US
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