Application of the Hillslope Erosion Model to predict annual sediment yield in Southwest New Mexico.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191305
Title:
Application of the Hillslope Erosion Model to predict annual sediment yield in Southwest New Mexico.
Author:
King, Chad Eric.
Issue Date:
2002
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Big Burro Mountains in southwest New Mexico has been undergoing a decrease in herbaceous vegetation and an increase in woody vegetation. Through numerous unnamed ephemeral drainages this area contributes a significant amount of sediment into Mangas Creek, which is a tributary of the Gila River. In 2004, a prescribed burn was conducted to remove the woody vegetation and encourage the growth of herbaceous cover vegetation to reduce the amount of hillslope erosion. The Hillslope Erosion Model was utilized to predict sediment yield occurring in both a burned area and a nearby unburned area. Erosion bridges were established onsite to measure sediment yield. A data logging rain gauge was also located at the monitoring site to measure rainfall duration and intensity. Preliminary data indicates that the Hillslope Erosion Model was found to be a reliable tool for predicting hillslope erosion following rain events greater than one inch.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Environmental sciences.; Aquatic animals -- Arizona.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil, Water and Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Fitzsimmons, Kevin

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleApplication of the Hillslope Erosion Model to predict annual sediment yield in Southwest New Mexico.en_US
dc.creatorKing, Chad Eric.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKing, Chad Eric.en_US
dc.date.issued2002en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Big Burro Mountains in southwest New Mexico has been undergoing a decrease in herbaceous vegetation and an increase in woody vegetation. Through numerous unnamed ephemeral drainages this area contributes a significant amount of sediment into Mangas Creek, which is a tributary of the Gila River. In 2004, a prescribed burn was conducted to remove the woody vegetation and encourage the growth of herbaceous cover vegetation to reduce the amount of hillslope erosion. The Hillslope Erosion Model was utilized to predict sediment yield occurring in both a burned area and a nearby unburned area. Erosion bridges were established onsite to measure sediment yield. A data logging rain gauge was also located at the monitoring site to measure rainfall duration and intensity. Preliminary data indicates that the Hillslope Erosion Model was found to be a reliable tool for predicting hillslope erosion following rain events greater than one inch.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshEnvironmental sciences.en_US
dc.subject.lcshAquatic animals -- Arizona.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairFitzsimmons, Kevinen_US
dc.identifier.oclc214289141en_US
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