Quantyfying consumptive water use by seep willow (Baccharis salicifolia) within the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area (SPRNCA).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191303
Title:
Quantyfying consumptive water use by seep willow (Baccharis salicifolia) within the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area (SPRNCA).
Author:
McGuire, Roberta Delehanty.
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Riparian evapotranspiration (ET) is the most challenging component to quantify when determining water budgets in semiarid basins. Primary interest has focused upon water use by riparian overstory vegetation; however understory vegetation has been ignored. Whole plant transpiration of the dominant understory shrub, seep willow (Baccharis salicifolia), was measured along a perennial reach of the San Pedro River for 133 days using the heat balance sap flow technique while key meteorological driving variables were measured from an adjacent meteorological tower. Transpiration was compared under two environmental conditions: a more open environment with decreased overstory canopy cover, and a more closed environment underneath a cottonwood (Populus fremontii) forest canopy. Transpiration at both sites was similar, indicating that transpiration was rarely demand-limited. Shrub growing season transpiration was greater than precipitation and of comparable magnitude to the overstory cottonwood. These results suggest that understory vegetation water use can be an important component of a semiarid riparian water budget.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Watershed management -- Arizona.; Water consumption.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Scott, Russell L.; Archer, Steve; Guertin, Phillip

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleQuantyfying consumptive water use by seep willow (Baccharis salicifolia) within the San Pedro Riparian National Conservation Area (SPRNCA).en_US
dc.creatorMcGuire, Roberta Delehanty.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMcGuire, Roberta Delehanty.en_US
dc.date.issued2005en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRiparian evapotranspiration (ET) is the most challenging component to quantify when determining water budgets in semiarid basins. Primary interest has focused upon water use by riparian overstory vegetation; however understory vegetation has been ignored. Whole plant transpiration of the dominant understory shrub, seep willow (Baccharis salicifolia), was measured along a perennial reach of the San Pedro River for 133 days using the heat balance sap flow technique while key meteorological driving variables were measured from an adjacent meteorological tower. Transpiration was compared under two environmental conditions: a more open environment with decreased overstory canopy cover, and a more closed environment underneath a cottonwood (Populus fremontii) forest canopy. Transpiration at both sites was similar, indicating that transpiration was rarely demand-limited. Shrub growing season transpiration was greater than precipitation and of comparable magnitude to the overstory cottonwood. These results suggest that understory vegetation water use can be an important component of a semiarid riparian water budget.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWatershed management -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subject.lcshWater consumption.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNatural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairScott, Russell L.en_US
dc.contributor.chairArcher, Steveen_US
dc.contributor.chairGuertin, Phillipen_US
dc.identifier.oclc214288846en_US
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