Microbial respiration as an index of soil aeration in compacted and sewage sludge amended soils

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191287
Title:
Microbial respiration as an index of soil aeration in compacted and sewage sludge amended soils
Author:
Neilson, Julia Killian Worsley,1958-
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The use of liquid sewage sludge on agricultural soils may improve productivity, but cause compaction due to an application procedure requiring multiple passes with heavy machinery. The movement of water through the soil profiles was used as an index indicating a greater degree of compaction in soils amended with high amounts of sewage sludge vs. low amounts or inorganic fertilizer. Laboratory studies developed a method to utilize CO 2 evolution from microbial respiration as an index of soil aeration. Samples of Pima clay loam soil of varying moisture levels were amended with inorganic fertilizer or sewage sludge and compacted to several bulk densities. Aeration restricted microbial respiration at 1.6 Mg m-3 bulk density and 0.24 g g -1 , and 1.4 Mg m -3 bulk density and 0.26 g g -1 moisture, with no variation due to soil amendments. Respiration rates increased in a compacted sewage sludge amended soil, after an incubation period, indicating an improvement in soil structure due to the sludge.
Type:
Thesis-Reproduction (electronic); text
LCSH Subjects:
Hydrology.; Sewage sludge as fertilizer.; Soil aeration.; Microbial respiration.
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Soil and Water Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Pepper, Ian L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMicrobial respiration as an index of soil aeration in compacted and sewage sludge amended soilsen_US
dc.creatorNeilson, Julia Killian Worsley,1958-en_US
dc.contributor.authorNeilson, Julia Killian Worsley,1958-en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe use of liquid sewage sludge on agricultural soils may improve productivity, but cause compaction due to an application procedure requiring multiple passes with heavy machinery. The movement of water through the soil profiles was used as an index indicating a greater degree of compaction in soils amended with high amounts of sewage sludge vs. low amounts or inorganic fertilizer. Laboratory studies developed a method to utilize CO 2 evolution from microbial respiration as an index of soil aeration. Samples of Pima clay loam soil of varying moisture levels were amended with inorganic fertilizer or sewage sludge and compacted to several bulk densities. Aeration restricted microbial respiration at 1.6 Mg m-3 bulk density and 0.24 g g -1 , and 1.4 Mg m -3 bulk density and 0.26 g g -1 moisture, with no variation due to soil amendments. Respiration rates increased in a compacted sewage sludge amended soil, after an incubation period, indicating an improvement in soil structure due to the sludge.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeThesis-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subject.lcshHydrology.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSewage sludge as fertilizer.en_US
dc.subject.lcshSoil aeration.en_US
dc.subject.lcshMicrobial respiration.en_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil and Water Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairPepper, Ian L.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213298652en_US
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