Dissolution and enhanced solubilization of immiscible phase organic liquids in porous media : Theoretical, laboratory, and field investigations

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191265
Title:
Dissolution and enhanced solubilization of immiscible phase organic liquids in porous media : Theoretical, laboratory, and field investigations
Author:
Tick, Geoffrey Ray
Issue Date:
2003
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This dissertation examines three different aspects of groundwater contamination by immiscible liquids, both at laboratory and field scale. The first component incorporates a study of denser than water immiscible-liquid dissolution at the laboratory scale that aims to describe the effects of immiscible liquid source-zone saturation, distribution, and length on dissolution rates. It was observed that overall immiscible-liquid saturation, distribution, and source zone length did not influence initial dissolution rates under the condition of the experiments. However, transient phase dissolution behavior, primarily observed by the heterogeneously packed columns, was significantly different to that of the homogeneously packed columns. This indicates that initial dissolution rates are comparable for these different systems, however it is demonstrated that immiscible liquid distributions (e.g., heterogeneity) can significantly effect transient dissolution rates. The second component investigates the effectiveness of a field-scale partitioning tracer test (PTT) for the measurement of the amount of denser than water immiscible liquid in the subsurface. It was demonstrated that the effectiveness of partitioning tracer test may be significantly limited by factors contributing to nonideal transport such as sorption, tracer mass, and immiscible liquid distribution. The third component examines the effectiveness of a field-scale remediation technology for the enhanced removal of denser than water immiscible liquid in the subsurface. An important component of this project was the implementation of reagent recovery and reuse, which improved the efficiency of the technology. It was demonstrated that the effectiveness of enhanced solubilization technologies for groundwater remediation may be significantly limited by the distribution of immiscible liquid in the subsurface. However, the nature of cyclodextrin (enhanced-solubilization agent) makes it an attractive option for subsurface remediation of immiscible-liquid contaminants, especially for situations where mobilization is undesirable and where the use of higher-toxicity agents is not possible.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Porous materials -- Fluid dynamics.; Organic compounds -- Solubility.; Solubility -- Testing.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDissolution and enhanced solubilization of immiscible phase organic liquids in porous media : Theoretical, laboratory, and field investigationsen_US
dc.creatorTick, Geoffrey Rayen_US
dc.contributor.authorTick, Geoffrey Rayen_US
dc.date.issued2003en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis dissertation examines three different aspects of groundwater contamination by immiscible liquids, both at laboratory and field scale. The first component incorporates a study of denser than water immiscible-liquid dissolution at the laboratory scale that aims to describe the effects of immiscible liquid source-zone saturation, distribution, and length on dissolution rates. It was observed that overall immiscible-liquid saturation, distribution, and source zone length did not influence initial dissolution rates under the condition of the experiments. However, transient phase dissolution behavior, primarily observed by the heterogeneously packed columns, was significantly different to that of the homogeneously packed columns. This indicates that initial dissolution rates are comparable for these different systems, however it is demonstrated that immiscible liquid distributions (e.g., heterogeneity) can significantly effect transient dissolution rates. The second component investigates the effectiveness of a field-scale partitioning tracer test (PTT) for the measurement of the amount of denser than water immiscible liquid in the subsurface. It was demonstrated that the effectiveness of partitioning tracer test may be significantly limited by factors contributing to nonideal transport such as sorption, tracer mass, and immiscible liquid distribution. The third component examines the effectiveness of a field-scale remediation technology for the enhanced removal of denser than water immiscible liquid in the subsurface. An important component of this project was the implementation of reagent recovery and reuse, which improved the efficiency of the technology. It was demonstrated that the effectiveness of enhanced solubilization technologies for groundwater remediation may be significantly limited by the distribution of immiscible liquid in the subsurface. However, the nature of cyclodextrin (enhanced-solubilization agent) makes it an attractive option for subsurface remediation of immiscible-liquid contaminants, especially for situations where mobilization is undesirable and where the use of higher-toxicity agents is not possible.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectPorous materials -- Fluid dynamics.en_US
dc.subjectOrganic compounds -- Solubility.en_US
dc.subjectSolubility -- Testing.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberYeh, T.-C. Jimen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFerre, P. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArtiola, Janick F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZhang, Zhihuien_US
dc.identifier.oclc225864187en_US
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