Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191245
Title:
Numerical study of shallow water models with variable topography
Author:
Ropp, David L.
Issue Date:
2000
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In this thesis we develop a model for the long-time horizontal circulation in a shallow lake. The goal is to have a model that can capture the large-scale features of the circulation yet can be run quickly and cheaply. We start with shallow water models and add relevant physical terms: Coriolis force, wind shear, bottom drag, viscosity, and nonhomogeneous boundary conditions. The resulting equations are similar to the two-dimensional Navier Stokes equations and can be analyzed with similar methods. We pose the equations in a weak form and show that they are well-posed. We then discretize the equations. We use the finite element method for the spatial discretization and show that our choice of elements satisfies stability criteria. Next we test our model. We first consider problems with analytically tractable behavior and verify that our model produces correct results. Then we model Lake Erie, both with no wind and with a steady wind. We compare the results of our model to experimentally obtained measurements of the currents. Our results compare well under conditions of no wind or of steady wind, but not as well when the wind is variable.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Lakes -- Circulation -- Mathematical models.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Applied Mathematics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Levermore, C. David

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNumerical study of shallow water models with variable topographyen_US
dc.creatorRopp, David L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRopp, David L.en_US
dc.date.issued2000en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn this thesis we develop a model for the long-time horizontal circulation in a shallow lake. The goal is to have a model that can capture the large-scale features of the circulation yet can be run quickly and cheaply. We start with shallow water models and add relevant physical terms: Coriolis force, wind shear, bottom drag, viscosity, and nonhomogeneous boundary conditions. The resulting equations are similar to the two-dimensional Navier Stokes equations and can be analyzed with similar methods. We pose the equations in a weak form and show that they are well-posed. We then discretize the equations. We use the finite element method for the spatial discretization and show that our choice of elements satisfies stability criteria. Next we test our model. We first consider problems with analytically tractable behavior and verify that our model produces correct results. Then we model Lake Erie, both with no wind and with a steady wind. We compare the results of our model to experimentally obtained measurements of the currents. Our results compare well under conditions of no wind or of steady wind, but not as well when the wind is variable.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectLakes -- Circulation -- Mathematical models.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineApplied Mathematicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairLevermore, C. Daviden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrio, Moyseyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBayley, Bruceen_US
dc.identifier.oclc226800013en_US
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