Sorption and Biodegradation of Organic Solutes Undergoing Transport in Laboratory-scale and Field-scale Heterogeneous Porous Media.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191215
Title:
Sorption and Biodegradation of Organic Solutes Undergoing Transport in Laboratory-scale and Field-scale Heterogeneous Porous Media.
Author:
Piatt, Joseph John,1966-
Issue Date:
1997
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The first study focused on the magnitude and rate of sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds by two, well-characterized soils. The composition of organic matter had a small effect on the magnitude of the organic carbon normalized equilibrium distribution coefficients. The sorbates sorbed more strongly to the humic-coated soil, most likely due to the organic matter's less polar nature as compared to the fulvic material. The molecular solute descriptor, ¹Xᵛ, performed slightly better than the empirical solute descriptor, K(ov), in evaluating equilibrium sorption coefficients. Thus, sorbate structure may have a secondary influence on the overall magnitude of equilibrium sorption. Sorbate structure exhibited a greater influence on sorption kinetics than on sorption equilibrium. Distinct differences in the magnitudes of mass transfer coefficients for the humic and fulvic soils were observed when relating them to the molecular solute descriptor, ¹Xᵛ. The differences in mass transfer coefficients were attributed to both sorbate structure and the quantity and morphology of soil organic matter. The intrasorbent diffusion coefficients were believed to be the same for both the humic and fulvic material. The second study focused on using a biodegradable solute to measure processes that affect in-situ biodegradation during well-controlled field and laboratory experiments. Specifically, this study investigated how residence time and scale influence the extent and rate of in-situ biodegradation of an organic solute undergoing transport. The transport of the biodegradable solute was compared to that of bromide and/or pentafluorobenzoic acid, which are conservative, non-degradable tracers. Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate both the flow velocity and residence time conditions existent in the field. Mass recovery the biodegradable solute decreased as the residence time increased, ranging from 14 to 95 percent for the field sites. Mass recoveries in the laboratory experiments were approximately 30% to 40 % less than in the field experiments. The first-order biodegradation rate constants did not vary with residence time for either field site. In addition, the average rate constant value for both field sites was very similar (0.21 d⁻¹).
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Environmental sciences.; Hydrophobic surfaces.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil, Water and Environmental Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Brusseau, Mark L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSorption and Biodegradation of Organic Solutes Undergoing Transport in Laboratory-scale and Field-scale Heterogeneous Porous Media.en_US
dc.creatorPiatt, Joseph John,1966-en_US
dc.contributor.authorPiatt, Joseph John,1966-en_US
dc.date.issued1997en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe first study focused on the magnitude and rate of sorption of hydrophobic organic compounds by two, well-characterized soils. The composition of organic matter had a small effect on the magnitude of the organic carbon normalized equilibrium distribution coefficients. The sorbates sorbed more strongly to the humic-coated soil, most likely due to the organic matter's less polar nature as compared to the fulvic material. The molecular solute descriptor, ¹Xᵛ, performed slightly better than the empirical solute descriptor, K(ov), in evaluating equilibrium sorption coefficients. Thus, sorbate structure may have a secondary influence on the overall magnitude of equilibrium sorption. Sorbate structure exhibited a greater influence on sorption kinetics than on sorption equilibrium. Distinct differences in the magnitudes of mass transfer coefficients for the humic and fulvic soils were observed when relating them to the molecular solute descriptor, ¹Xᵛ. The differences in mass transfer coefficients were attributed to both sorbate structure and the quantity and morphology of soil organic matter. The intrasorbent diffusion coefficients were believed to be the same for both the humic and fulvic material. The second study focused on using a biodegradable solute to measure processes that affect in-situ biodegradation during well-controlled field and laboratory experiments. Specifically, this study investigated how residence time and scale influence the extent and rate of in-situ biodegradation of an organic solute undergoing transport. The transport of the biodegradable solute was compared to that of bromide and/or pentafluorobenzoic acid, which are conservative, non-degradable tracers. Laboratory experiments were conducted to simulate both the flow velocity and residence time conditions existent in the field. Mass recovery the biodegradable solute decreased as the residence time increased, ranging from 14 to 95 percent for the field sites. Mass recoveries in the laboratory experiments were approximately 30% to 40 % less than in the field experiments. The first-order biodegradation rate constants did not vary with residence time for either field site. In addition, the average rate constant value for both field sites was very similar (0.21 d⁻¹).en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectEnvironmental sciences.en_US
dc.subjectHydrophobic surfaces.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil, Water and Environmental Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairBrusseau, Mark L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMiller, Raina M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberArtiola, Janick F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPemberton, Jeanne E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSaavedra, S. Scotten_US
dc.identifier.oclc213465606en_US
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