An institutional and economic assessment of water reuse in the Tucson Basin

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191151
Title:
An institutional and economic assessment of water reuse in the Tucson Basin
Author:
Lieuwen, Andrew L.
Issue Date:
1989
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
With groundwater resources becoming less available in the physical, economic, and legal senses, water reuse is rapidly gaining momentum in the arid West. An institutional assessment of water reuse in the Tucson Basin in Arizona indicates that despite institutional changes encouraging the substitution of effluent for native groundwater, many opportunities for water reuse are precluded by existing water rights arrangements and insufficient economic incentives. An economic assessment compares potential benefits and costs of implementing water reuse plans for the Tucson area with potential benefits and costs of alternative water-supply scenarios in which similar quantities of water are provided from other sources. Alternative water sources include pumping native groundwater, "reallocating" water saved through reduction in low value water uses, and importing surface water and groundwater from other basins. The results of this study indicate that at the present time, there is no convincing economic justification for increasing water reuse as planned by the City of Tucson. Not only are reduction in use and importation alternatives less costly to implement than increasing effluent use, they also save more groundwater. The results of the economic assessment indicate that the citizenry of the Tucson Basin would be better served if planned increases in the use of effluent in the Tucson metropolitan area were postponed until the costs become more competitive with the costs of alternatives.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Water reuse -- Arizona -- Tucson Basin.; Water resources development -- Arizona -- Tucson Basin.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Davis, Donald R.; Colby, B.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAn institutional and economic assessment of water reuse in the Tucson Basinen_US
dc.creatorLieuwen, Andrew L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLieuwen, Andrew L.en_US
dc.date.issued1989en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractWith groundwater resources becoming less available in the physical, economic, and legal senses, water reuse is rapidly gaining momentum in the arid West. An institutional assessment of water reuse in the Tucson Basin in Arizona indicates that despite institutional changes encouraging the substitution of effluent for native groundwater, many opportunities for water reuse are precluded by existing water rights arrangements and insufficient economic incentives. An economic assessment compares potential benefits and costs of implementing water reuse plans for the Tucson area with potential benefits and costs of alternative water-supply scenarios in which similar quantities of water are provided from other sources. Alternative water sources include pumping native groundwater, "reallocating" water saved through reduction in low value water uses, and importing surface water and groundwater from other basins. The results of this study indicate that at the present time, there is no convincing economic justification for increasing water reuse as planned by the City of Tucson. Not only are reduction in use and importation alternatives less costly to implement than increasing effluent use, they also save more groundwater. The results of the economic assessment indicate that the citizenry of the Tucson Basin would be better served if planned increases in the use of effluent in the Tucson metropolitan area were postponed until the costs become more competitive with the costs of alternatives.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectWater reuse -- Arizona -- Tucson Basin.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona -- Tucson Basin.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDavis, Donald R.en_US
dc.contributor.chairColby, B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, Paul N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBuras, Nathanen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBradley, Michael D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213339834en_US
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