Yield, dry matter production, and nitrogen uptake of drip irrigated cotton

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191143
Title:
Yield, dry matter production, and nitrogen uptake of drip irrigated cotton
Author:
Ahmed, Sabah Kedar.
Issue Date:
1988
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The study consisted of two experiments conducted over two growing seasons. Urea ammonium nitrate was used as a source of N at rates of 50, 75, 100 and 150% of levels estimated to be ideal for maximum yield of cotton (Gossvpium hirsutum L.). The nitrogen fertilizer was applied through a drip irrigation system. The yield of seed cotton, flowering pattern, boll set, plant N uptake, and dry matter production were studied in relation to four N fertilizer rates and two plant populations in the 1984 study. Yield of seed cotton, plant N uptake and dry matter production were studied in relation to four N rates, three seeding rates, and three cotton cultivars in the 1985 study. Petiole nitrate patterns were studied both seasons. The effect of N applications on seed cotton yield was dependent upon the initial soil N and the yield possibility. In this study the lower rate of N appeared to be sufficient for the yields obtained. Thinning resulted in reduction of the total number of flowers and significantly decreased yield, but percent boll set was not affected. Nitrogen additions significantly increased plant N uptake and dry matter production as well as petiole NO₃-N levels during the growing season. The N need of cotton under drip irrigation was determined throughout the growing season by using petiole analysis. The levels of petiole NO₃-N for N sufficiency and deficiency which are accepted under furrow irrigation cotton were shown to be applicable for drip irrigated cotton. Yield of DPL-775 and DPL-90 cotton cultivars was significantly higher than that for DPL-41 cotton cultivar in 1985.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Cotton growing -- Arizona.; Cotton -- Fertilizers.; Nitrogen fertilizers -- Arizona.; Fertilizers -- Application.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Soil and Water Science; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Stroehlein, Jack L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleYield, dry matter production, and nitrogen uptake of drip irrigated cottonen_US
dc.creatorAhmed, Sabah Kedar.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAhmed, Sabah Kedar.en_US
dc.date.issued1988en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe study consisted of two experiments conducted over two growing seasons. Urea ammonium nitrate was used as a source of N at rates of 50, 75, 100 and 150% of levels estimated to be ideal for maximum yield of cotton (Gossvpium hirsutum L.). The nitrogen fertilizer was applied through a drip irrigation system. The yield of seed cotton, flowering pattern, boll set, plant N uptake, and dry matter production were studied in relation to four N fertilizer rates and two plant populations in the 1984 study. Yield of seed cotton, plant N uptake and dry matter production were studied in relation to four N rates, three seeding rates, and three cotton cultivars in the 1985 study. Petiole nitrate patterns were studied both seasons. The effect of N applications on seed cotton yield was dependent upon the initial soil N and the yield possibility. In this study the lower rate of N appeared to be sufficient for the yields obtained. Thinning resulted in reduction of the total number of flowers and significantly decreased yield, but percent boll set was not affected. Nitrogen additions significantly increased plant N uptake and dry matter production as well as petiole NO₃-N levels during the growing season. The N need of cotton under drip irrigation was determined throughout the growing season by using petiole analysis. The levels of petiole NO₃-N for N sufficiency and deficiency which are accepted under furrow irrigation cotton were shown to be applicable for drip irrigated cotton. Yield of DPL-775 and DPL-90 cotton cultivars was significantly higher than that for DPL-41 cotton cultivar in 1985.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectCotton growing -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectCotton -- Fertilizers.en_US
dc.subjectNitrogen fertilizers -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectFertilizers -- Application.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSoil and Water Scienceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairStroehlein, Jack L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberTucker, T. C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBohn, H. L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHofmann, W. C.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213331705en_US
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