Land imprinting as an effective way of soil surface manipulation to revegetate arid lands

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191107
Title:
Land imprinting as an effective way of soil surface manipulation to revegetate arid lands
Author:
Abusuwar, Awad Osman Mohmed,1952-
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Research was conducted over a 2-year period at the University of Arizona Campus and Oracle Agricultural Centers to evaluate the effectiveness of surface imprintation in revegetating arid lands. Introduction of forage leguminous species into arid rangelands through land imprintat ion was another objective of this study. The soil at the Campus Center is a Brasito, mixed thermic, typic torripsamment with a sandy-loam texture. This was compared with a White House, fine mixed thermic, Ustollic haplargid with a sandyloam texture at the Oracle Center. Natural rains were the only source of irrigation at Oracle. At the Campus Center, however, a sprinkler irrigation system was installed to match rains with that at the Oracle Center. Three cover treatments together with four surface treatments were used at both sites. The cover treatments included a pure stand of grasses, a pure stand of legumes, and a mixture of both grasses and legumes. The surface treatments were imprinted, mulched, imprinted-mulched, and an untreated surface as a check. Surface imprintation was performed by a land imprinter at Oracle and by a hand imprinter at Campus. The imprinted surface significantly increased soil moisture retention, number of plants per unit area, plant height, plant cover, and biomass compared to the untreated surface. At the Oracle Center, the imprinted surface improved legume germination by 800% over the untreated surface, and by 367% over the mulched one. Corresponding percentages at Campus were 48 and 4% over the untreated and the mulched surfaces, respectively. Increases in biomass production achieved through surface imprintation were 102% over the untreated surface and 35% over the mulched surface at the Oracle Center. Corresponding increases at Campus were 63 and 33% over the untreated and the mulched surfaces, respectively. Plants grown on imprinted surfaces exhibited higher transpiration rates, lower diffusive resistance, and cooler leaf temperature compared to those grown on the untreated surfaces. Addition of mulch to the imprinted surface made no significant differences with respect to the parameters measured when compared to the imprinted surface without mulch. When mulch was used as a separate treatment, however, it significantly increased the parameters measured over the untreated surface. The effect of cover treatments on growth parameters and biomass production was masked by seasonality. Grasses tended to be superior over legumes in samples taken during the fall and the opposite was true during the summer. Mixing legumes with grasses, however, resulted in significantly taller grasses compared to grasses grown as a pure stand.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Plants -- Effect of soil compaction on.; Revegetation.; Arid regions.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Schonhorst, M. H.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLand imprinting as an effective way of soil surface manipulation to revegetate arid landsen_US
dc.creatorAbusuwar, Awad Osman Mohmed,1952-en_US
dc.contributor.authorAbusuwar, Awad Osman Mohmed,1952-en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractResearch was conducted over a 2-year period at the University of Arizona Campus and Oracle Agricultural Centers to evaluate the effectiveness of surface imprintation in revegetating arid lands. Introduction of forage leguminous species into arid rangelands through land imprintat ion was another objective of this study. The soil at the Campus Center is a Brasito, mixed thermic, typic torripsamment with a sandy-loam texture. This was compared with a White House, fine mixed thermic, Ustollic haplargid with a sandyloam texture at the Oracle Center. Natural rains were the only source of irrigation at Oracle. At the Campus Center, however, a sprinkler irrigation system was installed to match rains with that at the Oracle Center. Three cover treatments together with four surface treatments were used at both sites. The cover treatments included a pure stand of grasses, a pure stand of legumes, and a mixture of both grasses and legumes. The surface treatments were imprinted, mulched, imprinted-mulched, and an untreated surface as a check. Surface imprintation was performed by a land imprinter at Oracle and by a hand imprinter at Campus. The imprinted surface significantly increased soil moisture retention, number of plants per unit area, plant height, plant cover, and biomass compared to the untreated surface. At the Oracle Center, the imprinted surface improved legume germination by 800% over the untreated surface, and by 367% over the mulched one. Corresponding percentages at Campus were 48 and 4% over the untreated and the mulched surfaces, respectively. Increases in biomass production achieved through surface imprintation were 102% over the untreated surface and 35% over the mulched surface at the Oracle Center. Corresponding increases at Campus were 63 and 33% over the untreated and the mulched surfaces, respectively. Plants grown on imprinted surfaces exhibited higher transpiration rates, lower diffusive resistance, and cooler leaf temperature compared to those grown on the untreated surfaces. Addition of mulch to the imprinted surface made no significant differences with respect to the parameters measured when compared to the imprinted surface without mulch. When mulch was used as a separate treatment, however, it significantly increased the parameters measured over the untreated surface. The effect of cover treatments on growth parameters and biomass production was masked by seasonality. Grasses tended to be superior over legumes in samples taken during the fall and the opposite was true during the summer. Mixing legumes with grasses, however, resulted in significantly taller grasses compared to grasses grown as a pure stand.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectPlants -- Effect of soil compaction on.en_US
dc.subjectRevegetation.en_US
dc.subjectArid regions.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairSchonhorst, M. H.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDennis, R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarcarian, V.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213416410en_US
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