Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191103
Title:
Virus removal during conventional drinking water treatment
Author:
Rose, Joan Bray.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The isolation of viruses from treated drinking water has raised concerns that water treatment methods may not always adequately insure the removal of viruses from water designated for human consumption. The isolation of enteroviruses and rotavIruses from treated drinking water in a distribution system and at a water treatment plant has been previously reported. Isolation of viruses from drinking water that met recommended levels of coliform bacteria, chlorine and turbidity. The question is raised as to whether or not current drinking water standards ensure safe drinking water. The isolation of enteroviruses and rotaviruses from treated drinking water In a distribution system and at a water treatment plant. This study reports the results of a more extensive investigation on the removal of naturally occurring viruses by water treatment processes including prechlorination/clarification, filtration, and chlorination at a fullscale water treatment plant. The removal of enteroviruses and rotaviruses was studied at a full scale 205 mgd water treatment plant involving chemical clarification, sand filtration and chlorination. Enteric viruses, as well as coliphages, indicator bacteria, physical and chemical variables were measured in water samples taken at each stage of the drinking water treatment facility. Linear intercorrel ations were analyzed for all the variables. The numbers of standard plate count bacteria and coliphage were positively correlated to the presence of enteroviruses in the raw water while coliphage counts were positively correlated to the presence of rotaviruses in the finished water. Samples were taken during the dry and rainy seasons. During the dry season, it was found that reduction of enteroviruses and rotaviruses averaged 81% and 93%, respectively, for the complete treatment process and were the least efficiently removed as compared to the other microorganisms. The greatest reduction of enterovIruses occurred during pre-chlorination/flocculation and filtration, while a significant reduction of rotav I ru ses occurred during prechlorination/ flocculation and final chlorination. Enteroviruses or rotaviruses occurred in 24% of the finished water samples containing chlorine levels of >0.2 mg/L, and meeting coliform bacteria (1/100 ml) and turbidity (1 NTU) standards. During the rainy season removals were found to be far less efficient for all the variables and rotaviruses were isolated from all finished water samples. The results of this study indicate that finished water having measurable levels of free residual chlorine and meeting standards for col iform bacteria, and turbidity cannot be assumed to be virus free.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Water -- Purification -- Virus removal.; Waterborne infection.; Water -- Microbiology.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Microbiology and Immunology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleVirus removal during conventional drinking water treatmenten_US
dc.creatorRose, Joan Bray.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRose, Joan Bray.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe isolation of viruses from treated drinking water has raised concerns that water treatment methods may not always adequately insure the removal of viruses from water designated for human consumption. The isolation of enteroviruses and rotavIruses from treated drinking water in a distribution system and at a water treatment plant has been previously reported. Isolation of viruses from drinking water that met recommended levels of coliform bacteria, chlorine and turbidity. The question is raised as to whether or not current drinking water standards ensure safe drinking water. The isolation of enteroviruses and rotaviruses from treated drinking water In a distribution system and at a water treatment plant. This study reports the results of a more extensive investigation on the removal of naturally occurring viruses by water treatment processes including prechlorination/clarification, filtration, and chlorination at a fullscale water treatment plant. The removal of enteroviruses and rotaviruses was studied at a full scale 205 mgd water treatment plant involving chemical clarification, sand filtration and chlorination. Enteric viruses, as well as coliphages, indicator bacteria, physical and chemical variables were measured in water samples taken at each stage of the drinking water treatment facility. Linear intercorrel ations were analyzed for all the variables. The numbers of standard plate count bacteria and coliphage were positively correlated to the presence of enteroviruses in the raw water while coliphage counts were positively correlated to the presence of rotaviruses in the finished water. Samples were taken during the dry and rainy seasons. During the dry season, it was found that reduction of enteroviruses and rotaviruses averaged 81% and 93%, respectively, for the complete treatment process and were the least efficiently removed as compared to the other microorganisms. The greatest reduction of enterovIruses occurred during pre-chlorination/flocculation and filtration, while a significant reduction of rotav I ru ses occurred during prechlorination/ flocculation and final chlorination. Enteroviruses or rotaviruses occurred in 24% of the finished water samples containing chlorine levels of >0.2 mg/L, and meeting coliform bacteria (1/100 ml) and turbidity (1 NTU) standards. During the rainy season removals were found to be far less efficient for all the variables and rotaviruses were isolated from all finished water samples. The results of this study indicate that finished water having measurable levels of free residual chlorine and meeting standards for col iform bacteria, and turbidity cannot be assumed to be virus free.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Purification -- Virus removal.en_US
dc.subjectWaterborne infection.en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Microbiology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213415818en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.