Development of a method for the concentration of rotaviruses from water and its application to field sampling

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191100
Title:
Development of a method for the concentration of rotaviruses from water and its application to field sampling
Author:
Toranzos Soria, Gary Antonio.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Since their discovery in 1973, rotaviruses have been reported to be responsible for waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. The simian rotavirus (SA11) was used as a model for the human strains during the development of the method for concentration of rotaviruses from drinking and naturally occurring waters. The microporous filter method developed was capable of recovering an average of 49% of the input virus from 20 liters of tap water and an average of 31% from 378 liters. Of the various eluents evaluated, a mixture of 10% tryptose phosphate broth and 3% beef extract (pH 10.0) was found to give the greatest efficiency of elution. The 1MDS filters were found to be superior to the 50S for the concentration of SA11. The method developed was successfully used to concentrate viruses from environmental waters. Indigenous viruses were isolated from waters in Bolivia and Colombia. Several treatment plants as well as raw surface and groundwaters were sampled for the presence of entero— and rotaviruses. Rotaviruses were isolated from one sample which had undergone complete treatment and met all current standards for potability. This study indicated that enteric viruses can be found in drinking waters considered safe due to the absence of indicator bacteria. Prior to this study there were no reports of the occurrence of enteric viruses in water in Colombia or Bolivia. The results of this study also indicate the need for some type of virus monitoring of waters which are contaminated with sewage in order to evaluate the impact of these viruses on the population.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Water -- Purification -- Virus removal.; Waterborne infection.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Microbiology and Immunology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Gerba, Charles

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDevelopment of a method for the concentration of rotaviruses from water and its application to field samplingen_US
dc.creatorToranzos Soria, Gary Antonio.en_US
dc.contributor.authorToranzos Soria, Gary Antonio.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractSince their discovery in 1973, rotaviruses have been reported to be responsible for waterborne outbreaks of gastroenteritis. The simian rotavirus (SA11) was used as a model for the human strains during the development of the method for concentration of rotaviruses from drinking and naturally occurring waters. The microporous filter method developed was capable of recovering an average of 49% of the input virus from 20 liters of tap water and an average of 31% from 378 liters. Of the various eluents evaluated, a mixture of 10% tryptose phosphate broth and 3% beef extract (pH 10.0) was found to give the greatest efficiency of elution. The 1MDS filters were found to be superior to the 50S for the concentration of SA11. The method developed was successfully used to concentrate viruses from environmental waters. Indigenous viruses were isolated from waters in Bolivia and Colombia. Several treatment plants as well as raw surface and groundwaters were sampled for the presence of entero— and rotaviruses. Rotaviruses were isolated from one sample which had undergone complete treatment and met all current standards for potability. This study indicated that enteric viruses can be found in drinking waters considered safe due to the absence of indicator bacteria. Prior to this study there were no reports of the occurrence of enteric viruses in water in Colombia or Bolivia. The results of this study also indicate the need for some type of virus monitoring of waters which are contaminated with sewage in order to evaluate the impact of these viruses on the population.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectWater -- Purification -- Virus removal.en_US
dc.subjectWaterborne infection.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMicrobiology and Immunologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairGerba, Charlesen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213414873en_US
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