Water and stress effects on growth and rubber : accumulation in guayule (Parthenium argentatum gray)

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191086
Title:
Water and stress effects on growth and rubber : accumulation in guayule (Parthenium argentatum gray)
Author:
Garrot, Donald Jerome.
Issue Date:
1984
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Recently, canopy temperature measurements and atmospheric vapor pressure deficits have been used to determine water stress in numerous plant species. A linear regression of the two parameters yields a crop water stress index (CWSI) baseline capable of determining a fraction of water stress between 0 (wet) and 100 (dry). Such a baseline was determined for one line of guayule (N396) in the spring of 1983 and used to determine time of irrigation for field plots. Three irrigation treatments were chosen based on CWSI measurements to aquire a relationship between rubber yield and water Stress. Treatments were irrigated when their respective CWSI measurements reached 0.30 (wet=1), 0.60 (medium=2), and 0.90 (dry=3). Duplicate tests were planted to determine if water delivery by drip irrigation differed from furrow irrigated plots. Very good correlations exist between rubber yield and seasonally averaged CWSI (r = 0.85). The interrelationship of rubber yield and total water applied was also high with r = 0.87. The highest rubber yield occurred in March in treatment 1 (wet) in the furrow irrigated field. Rubber yield was positively correlated with total water applied and inversely correlated with CWSI. Small differences were observed between the type of water delivery system used with similar treatments from both fields not being significantly different. The wet and medium treatments in both fields were about the same with the dry treatment being significantly different from the wet and medium treatments for total water applied. This indicates that guayule is not as sensitive to changes of 0.30 CWSI units as other species measured. Correlations between the CWSI and soil moisture deficits were very good with r=0.83 for 1983 and r=0.91 for 1984 indicating the CWSI can be used accurately to determine soil moisture deficits and vice-versa. A 0-stress moisture deficit range (0-SMDR) was determined for guayule where 0.0-2.26 and 0.0-4.58 cm (1983 and 1984, respectively) of water could be depleted from the soil profile before the plants showed stress as indicated by the CWSI. The 0-SMDR appears to be constant for a particular plant species in the same field for a particular year and may further define and standardize plant available soil moisture.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Plant-water relationships.; Plants -- Effect of soil moisture on.; Guayule.; Rubber plants.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Endrizzi, J. E.; Ray, D. T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleWater and stress effects on growth and rubber : accumulation in guayule (Parthenium argentatum gray)en_US
dc.creatorGarrot, Donald Jerome.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGarrot, Donald Jerome.en_US
dc.date.issued1984en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRecently, canopy temperature measurements and atmospheric vapor pressure deficits have been used to determine water stress in numerous plant species. A linear regression of the two parameters yields a crop water stress index (CWSI) baseline capable of determining a fraction of water stress between 0 (wet) and 100 (dry). Such a baseline was determined for one line of guayule (N396) in the spring of 1983 and used to determine time of irrigation for field plots. Three irrigation treatments were chosen based on CWSI measurements to aquire a relationship between rubber yield and water Stress. Treatments were irrigated when their respective CWSI measurements reached 0.30 (wet=1), 0.60 (medium=2), and 0.90 (dry=3). Duplicate tests were planted to determine if water delivery by drip irrigation differed from furrow irrigated plots. Very good correlations exist between rubber yield and seasonally averaged CWSI (r = 0.85). The interrelationship of rubber yield and total water applied was also high with r = 0.87. The highest rubber yield occurred in March in treatment 1 (wet) in the furrow irrigated field. Rubber yield was positively correlated with total water applied and inversely correlated with CWSI. Small differences were observed between the type of water delivery system used with similar treatments from both fields not being significantly different. The wet and medium treatments in both fields were about the same with the dry treatment being significantly different from the wet and medium treatments for total water applied. This indicates that guayule is not as sensitive to changes of 0.30 CWSI units as other species measured. Correlations between the CWSI and soil moisture deficits were very good with r=0.83 for 1983 and r=0.91 for 1984 indicating the CWSI can be used accurately to determine soil moisture deficits and vice-versa. A 0-stress moisture deficit range (0-SMDR) was determined for guayule where 0.0-2.26 and 0.0-4.58 cm (1983 and 1984, respectively) of water could be depleted from the soil profile before the plants showed stress as indicated by the CWSI. The 0-SMDR appears to be constant for a particular plant species in the same field for a particular year and may further define and standardize plant available soil moisture.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectPlant-water relationships.en_US
dc.subjectPlants -- Effect of soil moisture on.en_US
dc.subjectGuayule.en_US
dc.subjectRubber plants.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairEndrizzi, J. E.en_US
dc.contributor.chairRay, D. T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberO'Leary, James W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMatsuda, Kaoruen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFangmeier, Delmar D.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213297602en_US
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