Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191081
Title:
Halocarbons in ground water, Tucson, Arizona
Author:
Randall, Jeffery Hunt.
Issue Date:
1983
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Interest in halocarbons has been sparked by experimental evidence suggesting that these compounds are potential carcinogens and teratogens. The U.S. EPA started a nationwide program in 1970 to identify and quantify trace organic compounds in public water supplies and sewage effluents. To date no detailed large-scale areal ground-water surveys delineating concentrations of these halocarbons have been reported in the literature at the part per trillion level and below. The objectives of this dissertation are twofold: (1) identification, quantification, and detailed areal mapping of several halocarbon species in ground water near the Santa Cruz River northwest of Tucson, Arizona; and (2) development of halocarbon techniques for age dating recently recharged (0-40 years old) ground water. The halocarbon compounds considered are: trichlorofluoromethane (CC1₃F), dichlorodifluoromethane (CC1₂F₂), carbon tetrachloride (CC1₄), chloroform (CHC1₃), trichloroethylene (C₂HC1₃), methyl chloroform (CH₃CC1₃), and tetrachloroethylene (C₂C1₄). Objective (1) includes discussions of the areal halocarbon distributions detected in the ground water, their sources, and a qualitative comparison of the distributions to ground-water quality and land use patterns adjacent to the Santa Cruz River. Objective (2) utilizes the exponential atmospheric concentration buildup of CCl₂F₂, CC1₃F, and CCl₄, and the ratios of CCl₂F₂ to CCl₃F and CCl₄ to CCl₃F. Water samples from wells and the Santa Cruz River were collected in glass syringes and brought to the laboratory for analysis. An electron-capture gas chromatograph coupled to a gas stripping/concentration unit was used to quantify the halocarbons. Four high concentration areas were delineated, each probably associated with a different source: the CWUA area which was irrigated with sewage effluent during the 1960's; Rillito Creek (near its confluence with the Santa Cruz) which is a major ground-water recharge source; the Ina Road treatment plant/landfill/oxidation ponds area; and the Roger Road treatment plant "sewer farm" which is irrigated with sewage effluent. The CCl₂F₂ to CCl₃F ratio distribution indicates that most ground water in the study area is at least partially mixed with recharge less than 30 years old. The ground water adjacent to the Rillito has an apparent age of less than 10 years, in agreement with the CCl₃F distribution. Ground water in the Cortaro area has an apparent age of about 25 years, correlating with the start of irrigation in the area.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Halocarbons.; Groundwater -- Pollution -- Arizona -- Tucson Region.; Groundwater -- Pollution -- Arizona -- Pima County.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Davis, Stanley N.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHalocarbons in ground water, Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorRandall, Jeffery Hunt.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRandall, Jeffery Hunt.en_US
dc.date.issued1983en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractInterest in halocarbons has been sparked by experimental evidence suggesting that these compounds are potential carcinogens and teratogens. The U.S. EPA started a nationwide program in 1970 to identify and quantify trace organic compounds in public water supplies and sewage effluents. To date no detailed large-scale areal ground-water surveys delineating concentrations of these halocarbons have been reported in the literature at the part per trillion level and below. The objectives of this dissertation are twofold: (1) identification, quantification, and detailed areal mapping of several halocarbon species in ground water near the Santa Cruz River northwest of Tucson, Arizona; and (2) development of halocarbon techniques for age dating recently recharged (0-40 years old) ground water. The halocarbon compounds considered are: trichlorofluoromethane (CC1₃F), dichlorodifluoromethane (CC1₂F₂), carbon tetrachloride (CC1₄), chloroform (CHC1₃), trichloroethylene (C₂HC1₃), methyl chloroform (CH₃CC1₃), and tetrachloroethylene (C₂C1₄). Objective (1) includes discussions of the areal halocarbon distributions detected in the ground water, their sources, and a qualitative comparison of the distributions to ground-water quality and land use patterns adjacent to the Santa Cruz River. Objective (2) utilizes the exponential atmospheric concentration buildup of CCl₂F₂, CC1₃F, and CCl₄, and the ratios of CCl₂F₂ to CCl₃F and CCl₄ to CCl₃F. Water samples from wells and the Santa Cruz River were collected in glass syringes and brought to the laboratory for analysis. An electron-capture gas chromatograph coupled to a gas stripping/concentration unit was used to quantify the halocarbons. Four high concentration areas were delineated, each probably associated with a different source: the CWUA area which was irrigated with sewage effluent during the 1960's; Rillito Creek (near its confluence with the Santa Cruz) which is a major ground-water recharge source; the Ina Road treatment plant/landfill/oxidation ponds area; and the Roger Road treatment plant "sewer farm" which is irrigated with sewage effluent. The CCl₂F₂ to CCl₃F ratio distribution indicates that most ground water in the study area is at least partially mixed with recharge less than 30 years old. The ground water adjacent to the Rillito has an apparent age of less than 10 years, in agreement with the CCl₃F distribution. Ground water in the Cortaro area has an apparent age of about 25 years, correlating with the start of irrigation in the area.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectHalocarbons.en_US
dc.subjectGroundwater -- Pollution -- Arizona -- Tucson Region.en_US
dc.subjectGroundwater -- Pollution -- Arizona -- Pima County.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairDavis, Stanley N.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSimpson, Eugene S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLong, Austinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilson, L. Grayen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMoyers, Jarvisen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213096783en_US
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