Regional economics: a subset of "Simulation of the effects of coal-fired power development in the Four Corners Region."

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191008
Title:
Regional economics: a subset of "Simulation of the effects of coal-fired power development in the Four Corners Region."
Author:
Everett, Wayne Leonari,1945-
Issue Date:
1974
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The focal point of the quality of life associated with the United States is a strong economy. Growth in the economy means growth in employment. The establishment of stringent environmental legislation is now a reality. However, those responsible for enacting environmental laws, as well intentioned as they may be, must strive to assess the socio-economic consequences of their actions so that the true net benefit of the environmental legislation is established. The main effort in this research centers around the analysis of how a particular resource, energy (i.e., energy in the form of electric power derived from strip-mined coal) is embedded in the economic growth of the Southwest. The basic econometric tool that has been utilized is a regional input-output model which evolved from a California-Arizona linked input-output model developed by H. O. Carter and D. Ireri. The decision space developed, which effectively acted as a mechanism for restricting coal-fired power availability in future years, was based on a schedule of electric energy capacity additions as delineated by the U.S. Department of Interior's Southwest Energy Study. The regional economic analysis, described in Chapter 5 of this dissertation, suggests there is a definite relationship between coal-fired power availability and regional economic growth in the Southwest. Furthermore, the estimates of incremental decreases in regional economic activity associated with certain levels of decreased coal-fired power development are of such a magnitude that one could characterize the relationship as very significant.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Coal-fired power plants -- Four Corners Region.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Roefs, T. G.; Gum, Russell L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRegional economics: a subset of "Simulation of the effects of coal-fired power development in the Four Corners Region."en_US
dc.creatorEverett, Wayne Leonari,1945-en_US
dc.contributor.authorEverett, Wayne Leonari,1945-en_US
dc.date.issued1974en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe focal point of the quality of life associated with the United States is a strong economy. Growth in the economy means growth in employment. The establishment of stringent environmental legislation is now a reality. However, those responsible for enacting environmental laws, as well intentioned as they may be, must strive to assess the socio-economic consequences of their actions so that the true net benefit of the environmental legislation is established. The main effort in this research centers around the analysis of how a particular resource, energy (i.e., energy in the form of electric power derived from strip-mined coal) is embedded in the economic growth of the Southwest. The basic econometric tool that has been utilized is a regional input-output model which evolved from a California-Arizona linked input-output model developed by H. O. Carter and D. Ireri. The decision space developed, which effectively acted as a mechanism for restricting coal-fired power availability in future years, was based on a schedule of electric energy capacity additions as delineated by the U.S. Department of Interior's Southwest Energy Study. The regional economic analysis, described in Chapter 5 of this dissertation, suggests there is a definite relationship between coal-fired power availability and regional economic growth in the Southwest. Furthermore, the estimates of incremental decreases in regional economic activity associated with certain levels of decreased coal-fired power development are of such a magnitude that one could characterize the relationship as very significant.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectCoal-fired power plants -- Four Corners Region.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairRoefs, T. G.en_US
dc.contributor.chairGum, Russell L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInce, Simonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHarshbarger, John W.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc213386896en_US
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