Analysis of a multipurpose water resource system in southeastern Mexico.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/191007
Title:
Analysis of a multipurpose water resource system in southeastern Mexico.
Author:
Kunkel, J. R.
Issue Date:
1974
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Justification for the construction of water resource projects in developing countries has been traditionally based on benefit-cost analysis. This dissertation focuses on the standardized cost-effectiveness analysis for the planning, design and operation of water resource projects in developing countries and in particular southeastern Mexico. The "best" system is determined in terms of goals which reflect the physical, economic and social conditions of the region. The planning process starts by identifying goals which the water resource system or systems are desired to meet. These goals are then mapped into specifications in which the project needs are represented. Next, criteria or measures of effectiveness relating specifications to system capabilities are defined. These criteria are quantitative and qualitative. District alternative systems to meet the goals are defined and then their capabilities in terms of the measures of effectiveness are determined. The alternatives are then compared using both quantitative and qualitative measures of effectiveness. Then, using either a fixed-cost or fixed-effectiveness approach, the alternative system which most nearly satisfies the desired goals is selected. This study uses a real water resource system from which real decisions will be made. The methodology suggests improved ways of defining goals and criteria in developing countries and sets forth a concise framework upon which developing countries may base future water resource planning, design and operation.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Water resources development -- Mexico.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Hydrology and Water Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Qashu, Hasan K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleAnalysis of a multipurpose water resource system in southeastern Mexico.en_US
dc.creatorKunkel, J. R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorKunkel, J. R.en_US
dc.date.issued1974en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractJustification for the construction of water resource projects in developing countries has been traditionally based on benefit-cost analysis. This dissertation focuses on the standardized cost-effectiveness analysis for the planning, design and operation of water resource projects in developing countries and in particular southeastern Mexico. The "best" system is determined in terms of goals which reflect the physical, economic and social conditions of the region. The planning process starts by identifying goals which the water resource system or systems are desired to meet. These goals are then mapped into specifications in which the project needs are represented. Next, criteria or measures of effectiveness relating specifications to system capabilities are defined. These criteria are quantitative and qualitative. District alternative systems to meet the goals are defined and then their capabilities in terms of the measures of effectiveness are determined. The alternatives are then compared using both quantitative and qualitative measures of effectiveness. Then, using either a fixed-cost or fixed-effectiveness approach, the alternative system which most nearly satisfies the desired goals is selected. This study uses a real water resource system from which real decisions will be made. The methodology suggests improved ways of defining goals and criteria in developing countries and sets forth a concise framework upon which developing countries may base future water resource planning, design and operation.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Mexico.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHydrology and Water Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairQashu, Hasan K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDavis, Donald R.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberThorud, David B.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberInce, Simonen_US
dc.identifier.oclc213298745en_US
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