Economic aspects of agricultural use of Colorado River water in Yuma County, Arizona.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/190951
Title:
Economic aspects of agricultural use of Colorado River water in Yuma County, Arizona.
Author:
Jones, Douglas Morgan,1932-
Issue Date:
1968
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The investigation reported in this dissertation is a portion of a larger effort to determine how allocation of water resources affects economic and social development in an arid environment. The study focuses on irrigated crop agriculture in Western Yuma County, Arizona, where irrigation water supplies are obtained from diversions from the Colorado River. Irrigated agriculture accounts for nearly 95 percent of total water use in this area. Linear programming techniques are used to determine optimum farm output and resource use patterns for five different farm models representing different farm size groups. The farm models were synthesized from data collected in a survey of 102 farms within the study area in 1964. This sample represented about one-fourth of the total universe. The linear programming analysis proceeds in four phases. In the first phase solutions are obtained for each model under the assumption that the size structure of agricultural firms and the resource base is fixed at current levels. In the second phase additional activities are added to permit land acquisition or disposal by each model farm. In the third phase the original formulation is modified to permit reclamation of new lands under the assumption that existing water rights will be perfected. The fourth phase combines the individual models analyzed in phase two into an integrated general model in which resource disposals by one farm size model must be balanced by acquisition in another. The final stage of the analysis includes estimates of crop output, and resource use under conditions specified in each phase. The marginal value product of selected resources is discussed and demand schedule for additional water is estimated. Land transfer price ranges are also discussed.
Type:
Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic); text
Keywords:
Hydrology.; Water resources development -- Arizona.; Irrigation -- Arizona -- Yuma County.; Agriculture -- Economic aspects -- Arizona -- Yuma County.
Degree Name:
Ph. D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Economics; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
Young, Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEconomic aspects of agricultural use of Colorado River water in Yuma County, Arizona.en_US
dc.creatorJones, Douglas Morgan,1932-en_US
dc.contributor.authorJones, Douglas Morgan,1932-en_US
dc.date.issued1968en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe investigation reported in this dissertation is a portion of a larger effort to determine how allocation of water resources affects economic and social development in an arid environment. The study focuses on irrigated crop agriculture in Western Yuma County, Arizona, where irrigation water supplies are obtained from diversions from the Colorado River. Irrigated agriculture accounts for nearly 95 percent of total water use in this area. Linear programming techniques are used to determine optimum farm output and resource use patterns for five different farm models representing different farm size groups. The farm models were synthesized from data collected in a survey of 102 farms within the study area in 1964. This sample represented about one-fourth of the total universe. The linear programming analysis proceeds in four phases. In the first phase solutions are obtained for each model under the assumption that the size structure of agricultural firms and the resource base is fixed at current levels. In the second phase additional activities are added to permit land acquisition or disposal by each model farm. In the third phase the original formulation is modified to permit reclamation of new lands under the assumption that existing water rights will be perfected. The fourth phase combines the individual models analyzed in phase two into an integrated general model in which resource disposals by one farm size model must be balanced by acquisition in another. The final stage of the analysis includes estimates of crop output, and resource use under conditions specified in each phase. The marginal value product of selected resources is discussed and demand schedule for additional water is estimated. Land transfer price ranges are also discussed.en_US
dc.description.notehydrology collectionen_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.subjectHydrology.en_US
dc.subjectWater resources development -- Arizona.en_US
dc.subjectIrrigation -- Arizona -- Yuma County.en_US
dc.subjectAgriculture -- Economic aspects -- Arizona -- Yuma County.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh. D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEconomicsen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairYoung, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKelso, M. M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMartin, William E.en_US
dc.identifier.oclc225158195en_US
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