Rainwater Harvesting in U.S.-Mexico Border Colonias: Integrating Alternative Infrastructure in Planning

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/190651
Title:
Rainwater Harvesting in U.S.-Mexico Border Colonias: Integrating Alternative Infrastructure in Planning
Author:
Prasek, Sarah Marie
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Rapid population growth coupled with inadequate infrastructure has called into question both human health and environmental sustainability in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Of particular concern is the lack of water and wastewater infrastructure in border colonias. Though some progress has been made in improving the situation of certain communities, many continue to live in significantly substandard conditions. This study explores the potential that rainwater harvesting may have for partially filling colonias’ safe water needs. Two objectives motivate the analysis. First, the impact rainwater harvesting might have on residents’ water budgets is measured through a simulation using information from an existing colonia in Arizona. A cost estimate of a rainwater harvesting system in the chosen colonia is also prepared so that economic comparisons with other infrastructure types might be made. Second, interviews with project funding agencies begin to explore why this alternative technology is not more widely used in locations where it appears to be a viable water-obtaining strategy. The research findings indicate that rainwater harvesting can be used to substantially and affordably increase onsite water availability in colonias, and suggests that increased attention be given to this alternative approach in infrastructure planning for especially remote and/or small colonia settlements.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Planning
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleRainwater Harvesting in U.S.-Mexico Border Colonias: Integrating Alternative Infrastructure in Planningen_US
dc.creatorPrasek, Sarah Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorPrasek, Sarah Marieen_US
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractRapid population growth coupled with inadequate infrastructure has called into question both human health and environmental sustainability in the U.S.-Mexico border region. Of particular concern is the lack of water and wastewater infrastructure in border colonias. Though some progress has been made in improving the situation of certain communities, many continue to live in significantly substandard conditions. This study explores the potential that rainwater harvesting may have for partially filling colonias’ safe water needs. Two objectives motivate the analysis. First, the impact rainwater harvesting might have on residents’ water budgets is measured through a simulation using information from an existing colonia in Arizona. A cost estimate of a rainwater harvesting system in the chosen colonia is also prepared so that economic comparisons with other infrastructure types might be made. Second, interviews with project funding agencies begin to explore why this alternative technology is not more widely used in locations where it appears to be a viable water-obtaining strategy. The research findings indicate that rainwater harvesting can be used to substantially and affordably increase onsite water availability in colonias, and suggests that increased attention be given to this alternative approach in infrastructure planning for especially remote and/or small colonia settlements.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlanningen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEsparza, Adrianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLaurian, Lucieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBrittain, Richarden_US
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