Open Space Preservation: A Case Study of Mohave, Yavapai, and Cochise Counties in Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/190222
Title:
Open Space Preservation: A Case Study of Mohave, Yavapai, and Cochise Counties in Arizona
Author:
Mirela, Hromatka
Issue Date:
2005
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Open space preservation becomes an increasingly important concern in areas with a rapid population growth and extensive land consumption. Open space provides multiple benefits to people on both local and regional scales, including recreational, environmental, economic, and ecological benefits. Land ownership determines how land is managed, utilized, or conserved. Taking this into consideration, some lands are designated for open space and permanently preserved while others can be sold and lost to different uses, such as residential and commercial. Different stakeholders are involved in preservation of open space, including governments, private conservation organizations and others, and they all have a great impact on preservation efforts. In Arizona, land consumption outpaced the population growth, meaning that land is consumed at a faster rate than necessary. Rural communities are often targets of the increased interest of urban population in rural lifestyle and healthier living. These communities experience an escalating demand for land and housing in relatively close proximity to open space. This research was done to explore the idea of how some of Arizona’s rural counties plan for preservation of open space. Different open space preservation techniques are employed by each of the three selected Arizona counties, depending on needs, demands, desires, and availability of funding for preservation.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Planning
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleOpen Space Preservation: A Case Study of Mohave, Yavapai, and Cochise Counties in Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorMirela, Hromatkaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMirela, Hromatkaen_US
dc.date.issued2005-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractOpen space preservation becomes an increasingly important concern in areas with a rapid population growth and extensive land consumption. Open space provides multiple benefits to people on both local and regional scales, including recreational, environmental, economic, and ecological benefits. Land ownership determines how land is managed, utilized, or conserved. Taking this into consideration, some lands are designated for open space and permanently preserved while others can be sold and lost to different uses, such as residential and commercial. Different stakeholders are involved in preservation of open space, including governments, private conservation organizations and others, and they all have a great impact on preservation efforts. In Arizona, land consumption outpaced the population growth, meaning that land is consumed at a faster rate than necessary. Rural communities are often targets of the increased interest of urban population in rural lifestyle and healthier living. These communities experience an escalating demand for land and housing in relatively close proximity to open space. This research was done to explore the idea of how some of Arizona’s rural counties plan for preservation of open space. Different open space preservation techniques are employed by each of the three selected Arizona counties, depending on needs, demands, desires, and availability of funding for preservation.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlanningen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
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