A Cost / Benefit Analysis of Historic Districting in Tucson, Arizona

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/190200
Title:
A Cost / Benefit Analysis of Historic Districting in Tucson, Arizona
Author:
Krause, Andy
Issue Date:
2004
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The process of historic districting is often credited with stabilizing neighborhoods and thus increasing property values. For over twenty-five years city officials and academics have been conducting studies to determine if such a relationship actually exists. While early studies used a difference-on-difference methodology, recent studies have adopted hedonic modeling as a preferred method of determining the relationship between historic districts and property values. This study uses hedonic modeling together with a cost/benefit analysis to 1) determine if and to what extent historic districting impacts property values in Tucson, Arizona and 2) if the increase in the tax base outweighs the value of tax incentives granted within these districts. This research assesses the fiscal impact of both historic districting and the Arizona State Historic Property Tax Reclassification Program (SPT) in Tucson. This report consists of four sections. The first is a literature review of the brief history of preservation in the United States, a look at the economics of historic districting, and an overview of similar studies by other authors. The methodology of this study is contained in the second section and the hedonic model results and cost/benefit analysis follows in section three. The final section contains two policy recommendations to both the City of Tucson and the State of Arizona preservation officials: 1) Decrease the current SPT tax deduction rate 2) Implement a tax incentive for local districts.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
MS
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Planning
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA Cost / Benefit Analysis of Historic Districting in Tucson, Arizonaen_US
dc.creatorKrause, Andyen_US
dc.contributor.authorKrause, Andyen_US
dc.date.issued2004-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe process of historic districting is often credited with stabilizing neighborhoods and thus increasing property values. For over twenty-five years city officials and academics have been conducting studies to determine if such a relationship actually exists. While early studies used a difference-on-difference methodology, recent studies have adopted hedonic modeling as a preferred method of determining the relationship between historic districts and property values. This study uses hedonic modeling together with a cost/benefit analysis to 1) determine if and to what extent historic districting impacts property values in Tucson, Arizona and 2) if the increase in the tax base outweighs the value of tax incentives granted within these districts. This research assesses the fiscal impact of both historic districting and the Arizona State Historic Property Tax Reclassification Program (SPT) in Tucson. This report consists of four sections. The first is a literature review of the brief history of preservation in the United States, a look at the economics of historic districting, and an overview of similar studies by other authors. The methodology of this study is contained in the second section and the hedonic model results and cost/benefit analysis follows in section three. The final section contains two policy recommendations to both the City of Tucson and the State of Arizona preservation officials: 1) Decrease the current SPT tax deduction rate 2) Implement a tax incentive for local districts.-
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameMSen_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlanningen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBecker, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEsparza, Adrianen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJeffery, R. Brooksen_US
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