Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/190197
Title:
Building Reuse: Beyond Preservation, Towards Policy
Author:
Lovato, Michael J.
Issue Date:
2008
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
To be truly sustainable, a society must maximize the use and reuse of its existing resources. Yet the economics of the construction industry are designed to encourage the construction of new buildings as quickly and as cheaply as possible, and the demolition of existing buildings just as quickly. In order to achieve the levels of sustainability deemed essential by many of our nation’s leaders, the vast resource that our existing building stock represents can no longer be ignored, regardless of lack of historic signifi cance, perceived aesthetics, or energy effi ciency. Th is thesis summarizes and assesses the eff ectiveness of existing policies established in the interest of preservation, sustainability, and economic development that provide a strong framework for building reuse. Th is thesis outlines a feasible building reuse policy, conceived as largely independent from, but with the potential for, far-reaching benefi ts for preservation, sustainability, and economic interests.
Type:
text; Electronic Thesis
Degree Name:
M.S.
Degree Level:
masters
Degree Program:
Graduate College; Architecture
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleBuilding Reuse: Beyond Preservation, Towards Policyen_US
dc.creatorLovato, Michael J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLovato, Michael J.en_US
dc.date.issued2008-
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTo be truly sustainable, a society must maximize the use and reuse of its existing resources. Yet the economics of the construction industry are designed to encourage the construction of new buildings as quickly and as cheaply as possible, and the demolition of existing buildings just as quickly. In order to achieve the levels of sustainability deemed essential by many of our nation’s leaders, the vast resource that our existing building stock represents can no longer be ignored, regardless of lack of historic signifi cance, perceived aesthetics, or energy effi ciency. Th is thesis summarizes and assesses the eff ectiveness of existing policies established in the interest of preservation, sustainability, and economic development that provide a strong framework for building reuse. Th is thesis outlines a feasible building reuse policy, conceived as largely independent from, but with the potential for, far-reaching benefi ts for preservation, sustainability, and economic interests.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeElectronic Thesisen_US
thesis.degree.nameM.S.en_US
thesis.degree.levelmastersen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineArchitectureen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberJeffery, R. Brooksen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNequette, Annieen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBartlett, Susanen_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.