SOCIAL SUPPORT AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG SPOUSE CAREGIVERS OF DEMENTIA PATIENTS (ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188184
Title:
SOCIAL SUPPORT AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG SPOUSE CAREGIVERS OF DEMENTIA PATIENTS (ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE).
Author:
FOX, MARY VYN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study is an examination of the informal support systems of 40 spouse caregivers of dementia patients in relation to two variables associated with maintaining their patient at home: (1) the caregiver's experience of psychological distress, and (2) the caregiver's need for formal support. There now exists evidence to suggest that informal supports act to mediate the stress associated with caring for a dementia patient; however, research in the area of social supports has generally lacked careful definitions of the variables at work. To remedy that deficiency, distinctions were made in this study between the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of informal supports and the expressive and instrumental functions of informal supports. Initial analyses did not support the hypotheses that informal supports operate independently to buffer caregivers' experience of psychological distress and the need for formal support. However, when formal support was redefined in terms of two types of services--professional counseling services and community services--significant findings did emerge. Level of caregiver anxiety was found to be significantly related to perceived need for counseling services. Perceived need for community services was predicted by the combination of the patient's level of cognitive impairment, and the caregiver's experience of higher levels of anxiety and lower levels of informal expressive support. These results suggest that interventions directed toward the provision of services should be based on a thorough evaluation which includes the patient's level of functioning as well as the caregiver's emotional and instrumental resources. Professionals working with dementia patients and their families must be alerted to those caregivers who are at risk of severe emotional distress, and services should be provided to them before families collapse under the strain of caregiving.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kaszniak, Al

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSOCIAL SUPPORT AND PSYCHOLOGICAL DISTRESS AMONG SPOUSE CAREGIVERS OF DEMENTIA PATIENTS (ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE).en_US
dc.creatorFOX, MARY VYN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFOX, MARY VYN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study is an examination of the informal support systems of 40 spouse caregivers of dementia patients in relation to two variables associated with maintaining their patient at home: (1) the caregiver's experience of psychological distress, and (2) the caregiver's need for formal support. There now exists evidence to suggest that informal supports act to mediate the stress associated with caring for a dementia patient; however, research in the area of social supports has generally lacked careful definitions of the variables at work. To remedy that deficiency, distinctions were made in this study between the quantitative and qualitative dimensions of informal supports and the expressive and instrumental functions of informal supports. Initial analyses did not support the hypotheses that informal supports operate independently to buffer caregivers' experience of psychological distress and the need for formal support. However, when formal support was redefined in terms of two types of services--professional counseling services and community services--significant findings did emerge. Level of caregiver anxiety was found to be significantly related to perceived need for counseling services. Perceived need for community services was predicted by the combination of the patient's level of cognitive impairment, and the caregiver's experience of higher levels of anxiety and lower levels of informal expressive support. These results suggest that interventions directed toward the provision of services should be based on a thorough evaluation which includes the patient's level of functioning as well as the caregiver's emotional and instrumental resources. Professionals working with dementia patients and their families must be alerted to those caregivers who are at risk of severe emotional distress, and services should be provided to them before families collapse under the strain of caregiving.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKaszniak, Alen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBartlett, Neilen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberChristiansen, Harleyen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNewlon, Bettyen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613815en_US
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