THE TEACHER-STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS AS PERCEIVED BY LUMBEE INDIANS (AWARE, ACCEPT, SHARE, CHOOSE).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188181
Title:
THE TEACHER-STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS AS PERCEIVED BY LUMBEE INDIANS (AWARE, ACCEPT, SHARE, CHOOSE).
Author:
Chavis, Ben
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation focused on selected members of the Lumbee Indian tribe and sought to ascertain the recollected perceptions of their teacher-student relationships. A theoretical framework was chosen which emphasized the personal process, including the following categories: (1) aware, (2) accept, (3) share, and (4) choose. A search of related literature in each category was then conducted. An interview schedule was designed around the theoretical framework, which consisted of 14 questions from the four categories of aware, accept, share, and choose. It was administered to 44 members of the Lumbee Indian tribe. The participants were divided into two groups of 22 each, those who had attended an integrated school system and those who had attended a predominantly Indian school system. They were then qestioned regarding their recollections of the teacher-student relationships that they experienced in school. The data derived from the questions were then analyzed based on a theory of personal processes. A case study was presented in which a brother and sister who are members of the Lumbee Indian tribe shared their recollections of teacher-student relationships as they perceived them in an Indian school at the elementary level and an integrated school at the secondary level. From the data of the 44 interviews, a summary was presented, followed by recommendations for implementing a theory of personal processes in schools that serve Native American Indians. Based on the findings, Lumbees who attended the Indian schools felt that their teachers were aware of them and provided them the opportunity to experience freedom in their schools. Lumbees who attended the integrated schools were in less agreement that they experienced the personal process in school.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Teacher-student relationships -- North Carolina.; Indians of North America -- Education.; Lumbee Indians.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Secondary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, Paul M.
Committee Chair:
Allen, Paul M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE TEACHER-STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS AS PERCEIVED BY LUMBEE INDIANS (AWARE, ACCEPT, SHARE, CHOOSE).en_US
dc.creatorChavis, Benen_US
dc.contributor.authorChavis, Benen_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation focused on selected members of the Lumbee Indian tribe and sought to ascertain the recollected perceptions of their teacher-student relationships. A theoretical framework was chosen which emphasized the personal process, including the following categories: (1) aware, (2) accept, (3) share, and (4) choose. A search of related literature in each category was then conducted. An interview schedule was designed around the theoretical framework, which consisted of 14 questions from the four categories of aware, accept, share, and choose. It was administered to 44 members of the Lumbee Indian tribe. The participants were divided into two groups of 22 each, those who had attended an integrated school system and those who had attended a predominantly Indian school system. They were then qestioned regarding their recollections of the teacher-student relationships that they experienced in school. The data derived from the questions were then analyzed based on a theory of personal processes. A case study was presented in which a brother and sister who are members of the Lumbee Indian tribe shared their recollections of teacher-student relationships as they perceived them in an Indian school at the elementary level and an integrated school at the secondary level. From the data of the 44 interviews, a summary was presented, followed by recommendations for implementing a theory of personal processes in schools that serve Native American Indians. Based on the findings, Lumbees who attended the Indian schools felt that their teachers were aware of them and provided them the opportunity to experience freedom in their schools. Lumbees who attended the integrated schools were in less agreement that they experienced the personal process in school.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTeacher-student relationships -- North Carolina.en_US
dc.subjectIndians of North America -- Education.en_US
dc.subjectLumbee Indians.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.chairAllen, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarnes, William Donalden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGablak, Emil S.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHolm, Tomen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613811en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697297679en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.