STUDIES OF GANODERMA LUCIDUM AND GANODERMA TSUGAE (DELIGNIFICATION, MATING SYSTEMS, ROOT ROT, CULTURAL MORPHOLOGY, TAXONOMY).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188172
Title:
STUDIES OF GANODERMA LUCIDUM AND GANODERMA TSUGAE (DELIGNIFICATION, MATING SYSTEMS, ROOT ROT, CULTURAL MORPHOLOGY, TAXONOMY).
Author:
ADASKAVEG, JAMES ELLIOTT.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Ganoderma lucidum and G. tsugae are two members of the G. lucidum complex. The authenticity of the two wood-rotting species was demonstrated by comparative studies. Ganoderma lucidum is restricted to hardwoods. Its "smooth" walled basidiospores were characterized by narrow, numerous inter-wall pillars. Isolates of G. lucidum produced chlamydospores in culture and had an average growth of 7.8 mm/da at their optimum temperature range of 30-34 C. Ganoderma tsugae is restricted to conifers. Its basidiospores were "rough" walled and had broad inter-wall pillars. Isolates of G. tsugae did not produce chlamydospores in culture and had an average growth of 2.1 mm/da at the optimum temperature range of 20-25 C. Mating systems were determined for both species as heterothallic and tetrapolar. Interspecific matings of homokaryons were incompatible. Homokaryons of a European G. resinaceum isolate were interfertile with homokaryons from North American collections of G. lucidum. The ability of G. lucidum and G. tsugae to decay wood in vitro was studied using the following woods in agar block decay chambers: grape, oak, mesquite, white fir, and Douglas-fir. Grape wood lost the most weight while mesquite the least. G. lucidum isolates generally caused greater weight loss of all woods than did G. tsugae isolates. Both Ganoderma species caused simultaneous decay in all woods. However, chemical analyses of the decayed blocks indicated that selective delignification by both species also occurred in grape and white fir blocks but not in oak or Douglas-fir blocks. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated various stages of selective delignification and simultaneous decay of all woods tested. Isolates of Ganoderma lucidum infected Dog Ridge variety grape plants, grown in the greenhouse, from below-ground wood block inoculations. Twenty-four plants were inoculated: one plant died and 4 other plants declined. After 24 months reisolations yielded only G. lucidum from the five declining plants, demonstrating pathogenicity. The fungus developed in the heartwood and, in later stages, invaded the sapwood. Infected plants developed water stress symptoms with leaves wilting, yellowing, and dying. Field grape plants inoculated with the fungus developed decay columns as large as 42 cm in 17 mons. Decay was limited to the heartwood; no foliar symptoms occurred.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Wood-decaying fungi.; Fungi -- Morphology.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Pathology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Gilbertson, Robert L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSTUDIES OF GANODERMA LUCIDUM AND GANODERMA TSUGAE (DELIGNIFICATION, MATING SYSTEMS, ROOT ROT, CULTURAL MORPHOLOGY, TAXONOMY).en_US
dc.creatorADASKAVEG, JAMES ELLIOTT.en_US
dc.contributor.authorADASKAVEG, JAMES ELLIOTT.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractGanoderma lucidum and G. tsugae are two members of the G. lucidum complex. The authenticity of the two wood-rotting species was demonstrated by comparative studies. Ganoderma lucidum is restricted to hardwoods. Its "smooth" walled basidiospores were characterized by narrow, numerous inter-wall pillars. Isolates of G. lucidum produced chlamydospores in culture and had an average growth of 7.8 mm/da at their optimum temperature range of 30-34 C. Ganoderma tsugae is restricted to conifers. Its basidiospores were "rough" walled and had broad inter-wall pillars. Isolates of G. tsugae did not produce chlamydospores in culture and had an average growth of 2.1 mm/da at the optimum temperature range of 20-25 C. Mating systems were determined for both species as heterothallic and tetrapolar. Interspecific matings of homokaryons were incompatible. Homokaryons of a European G. resinaceum isolate were interfertile with homokaryons from North American collections of G. lucidum. The ability of G. lucidum and G. tsugae to decay wood in vitro was studied using the following woods in agar block decay chambers: grape, oak, mesquite, white fir, and Douglas-fir. Grape wood lost the most weight while mesquite the least. G. lucidum isolates generally caused greater weight loss of all woods than did G. tsugae isolates. Both Ganoderma species caused simultaneous decay in all woods. However, chemical analyses of the decayed blocks indicated that selective delignification by both species also occurred in grape and white fir blocks but not in oak or Douglas-fir blocks. Scanning electron microscopy demonstrated various stages of selective delignification and simultaneous decay of all woods tested. Isolates of Ganoderma lucidum infected Dog Ridge variety grape plants, grown in the greenhouse, from below-ground wood block inoculations. Twenty-four plants were inoculated: one plant died and 4 other plants declined. After 24 months reisolations yielded only G. lucidum from the five declining plants, demonstrating pathogenicity. The fungus developed in the heartwood and, in later stages, invaded the sapwood. Infected plants developed water stress symptoms with leaves wilting, yellowing, and dying. Field grape plants inoculated with the fungus developed decay columns as large as 42 cm in 17 mons. Decay was limited to the heartwood; no foliar symptoms occurred.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWood-decaying fungi.en_US
dc.subjectFungi -- Morphology.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Pathologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGilbertson, Robert L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberStanghellini, M. E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcClure, M. A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberAlorn, S. M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMisaghi, I.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613803en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697533907en_US
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