MORPHO-PHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATIONS OF ALEPPO AND BRUTIA PINE SEEDLINGS UNDER TWO DIFFERENT MOISTURE REGIMES (SYRIA, AFFORESTATION, CHLOROPLASTS).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188171
Title:
MORPHO-PHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATIONS OF ALEPPO AND BRUTIA PINE SEEDLINGS UNDER TWO DIFFERENT MOISTURE REGIMES (SYRIA, AFFORESTATION, CHLOROPLASTS).
Author:
ABIDO, MOHAMMAD SULEIMAN.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The mechanism of drought resistance in the seedlings of Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) and Brutia pine (Pinus brutia) was investigated. Both species showed anatomical and morphological adaptations to conserve moisture. Aleppo pine had a thicker cuticle, fewer stomata per unit length, per unit area, and per needle than Brutia pine. A significant number of Aleppo pine stomata were sealed with a waxy layer. Brutia pine had shorter needles, smaller needle surface area, a smaller surface area-to-volume ratio, and longer main root length. The two species were similar in height growth and in the seasonal trend of total non-structural carbohydrates (reducing sugars and starch). Brutia pine had more reducing sugars and less starch in its shoots than Aleppo pine. The latter had a greater amount of total non-structural carbohydrates and starch when the seedlings were subjected to dry down moisture stress. Electron microscopy techniques were used to monitor ultrastructural changes in the chloroplasts of mesophyll cells. Aleppo pine was found to contain chloroplasts exhibiting water stress-related damage at a relative water content of 62 percent, where as Brutia pine chloroplasts were disrupted. It is suggested that future investigations examine the physiological manifestation of drought mechanism at the cellular and molecular levels of both species.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Pine -- Morphology.; Pine -- Drought tolerance.; Pinus brutia -- Drought tolerance.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Renewable Natural Resources; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Ffolliott, Peter

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMORPHO-PHYSIOLOGICAL EVALUATIONS OF ALEPPO AND BRUTIA PINE SEEDLINGS UNDER TWO DIFFERENT MOISTURE REGIMES (SYRIA, AFFORESTATION, CHLOROPLASTS).en_US
dc.creatorABIDO, MOHAMMAD SULEIMAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorABIDO, MOHAMMAD SULEIMAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe mechanism of drought resistance in the seedlings of Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) and Brutia pine (Pinus brutia) was investigated. Both species showed anatomical and morphological adaptations to conserve moisture. Aleppo pine had a thicker cuticle, fewer stomata per unit length, per unit area, and per needle than Brutia pine. A significant number of Aleppo pine stomata were sealed with a waxy layer. Brutia pine had shorter needles, smaller needle surface area, a smaller surface area-to-volume ratio, and longer main root length. The two species were similar in height growth and in the seasonal trend of total non-structural carbohydrates (reducing sugars and starch). Brutia pine had more reducing sugars and less starch in its shoots than Aleppo pine. The latter had a greater amount of total non-structural carbohydrates and starch when the seedlings were subjected to dry down moisture stress. Electron microscopy techniques were used to monitor ultrastructural changes in the chloroplasts of mesophyll cells. Aleppo pine was found to contain chloroplasts exhibiting water stress-related damage at a relative water content of 62 percent, where as Brutia pine chloroplasts were disrupted. It is suggested that future investigations examine the physiological manifestation of drought mechanism at the cellular and molecular levels of both species.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPine -- Morphology.en_US
dc.subjectPine -- Drought tolerance.en_US
dc.subjectPinus brutia -- Drought tolerance.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineRenewable Natural Resourcesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorFfolliott, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZowlniski, Malcolmen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberFogel, Martinen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberKarpiscak, Martinen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613802en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697526004en_US
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