ZOO EXHIBIT DESIGN: A POST-OCCUPANCY EVALUATION AND COMPARISON OF ANIMAL ENCLOSURES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188163
Title:
ZOO EXHIBIT DESIGN: A POST-OCCUPANCY EVALUATION AND COMPARISON OF ANIMAL ENCLOSURES.
Author:
SHETTEL-NEUBER, MARY JOYCE.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The present study, in contrast with previous work that has isolated one or two important factors influencing the status of the zoo, considered the three important zoo reference groups--animals, visitors, and staff members--and their interrelationships within the zoo environment. Two approaches were used to investigate the system of interactions within the zoo. First, an in-depth examination of a new set of naturalistic exhibits was performed. Second, a comparison of two of these naturalistic exhibits with two older, sterile exhibits which housed the same species at the same zoo was made. Multiple methods were used in the present study and included behavior mapping of visitors, staff, and animals, timing of visitor stays at exhibits, tracking of visitors through the exhibits, a visitor questionnaire, and interviews with staff members. One major finding was the lack of correspondence among the major groups as to the acceptability of exhibits. For example, one exhibit which was considered beneficial to the enclosed animals and was well utilized and positively evaluated by visitors presented staff members with great difficulties in animal containment and exhibit maintenance. Comparisons of naturalistic enclosures and sterile cement enclosures housing the same species revealed no consistent, clear-cut differences in animal and visitor behavior, however, attitudinal differences were found for staff members and visitors. Visitors and staff members preferred the naturalistic exhibits and perceived them as more beneficial to animals and visitors. These findings were discussed in terms of theoretical and applied issues relevant to zoo design and management and to research in zoos.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Zoo animals -- Behavior.; Spatial behavior in animals.; Animal behavior.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleZOO EXHIBIT DESIGN: A POST-OCCUPANCY EVALUATION AND COMPARISON OF ANIMAL ENCLOSURES.en_US
dc.creatorSHETTEL-NEUBER, MARY JOYCE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSHETTEL-NEUBER, MARY JOYCE.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe present study, in contrast with previous work that has isolated one or two important factors influencing the status of the zoo, considered the three important zoo reference groups--animals, visitors, and staff members--and their interrelationships within the zoo environment. Two approaches were used to investigate the system of interactions within the zoo. First, an in-depth examination of a new set of naturalistic exhibits was performed. Second, a comparison of two of these naturalistic exhibits with two older, sterile exhibits which housed the same species at the same zoo was made. Multiple methods were used in the present study and included behavior mapping of visitors, staff, and animals, timing of visitor stays at exhibits, tracking of visitors through the exhibits, a visitor questionnaire, and interviews with staff members. One major finding was the lack of correspondence among the major groups as to the acceptability of exhibits. For example, one exhibit which was considered beneficial to the enclosed animals and was well utilized and positively evaluated by visitors presented staff members with great difficulties in animal containment and exhibit maintenance. Comparisons of naturalistic enclosures and sterile cement enclosures housing the same species revealed no consistent, clear-cut differences in animal and visitor behavior, however, attitudinal differences were found for staff members and visitors. Visitors and staff members preferred the naturalistic exhibits and perceived them as more beneficial to animals and visitors. These findings were discussed in terms of theoretical and applied issues relevant to zoo design and management and to research in zoos.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectZoo animals -- Behavior.en_US
dc.subjectSpatial behavior in animals.en_US
dc.subjectAnimal behavior.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBechtelen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberIttelsonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLockarden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDoxtateren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613447en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697519030en_US
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