LONELINESS AND THE MAINSTREAMED HEARING IMPAIRED COLLEGE STUDENT (DEAF).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188157
Title:
LONELINESS AND THE MAINSTREAMED HEARING IMPAIRED COLLEGE STUDENT (DEAF).
Author:
MURPHY, JAMES SAMUEL.
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to provide a starting point in the investigation of loneliness and mainstreamed hearing impaired college students. It was hypothesized that: hearing impaired students would be lonelier than a sample of hearing students (Russell, Peplau & Cutrona, 1980): hard-of-hearing students would be lonelier than deaf students: freshmen would be lonelier than upper-classmen: males would be lonelier than females: satisfaction with parental and peer relationships would relate inversely to loneliness: adjustment to disability would relate inversely to loneliness: comfort with speech for hard-of-hearing students and comfort with sign language for deaf students would relate inversely to loneliness. One hundred seventy volunteer subjects were drawn from eight mainstream colleges/universities. The questionnaire contained the Revised UCLA Loneliness scale (Russell, Peplau & Cutrona, 1980) as the measure of loneliness. The representativeness of the sample was supported. The validity of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale as a measure of loneliness for this population was discussed. Hearing impaired students were found to be more lonely than the hearing sample. Questions raised by this finding were discussed. The finding of no difference between mean loneliness scores in terms of the hard-of-hearing/deaf dichotomy, by year in school and by gender, were discussed. The inverse correlations that were found between individual loneliness scores and satisfaction with parental and peer relationships, adjustment to disability and comfort with speech and sign language were discussed in terms of practical significance. Conclusions and recommendations were made and caution was advised in the use of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale with other hearing impaired samples.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLONELINESS AND THE MAINSTREAMED HEARING IMPAIRED COLLEGE STUDENT (DEAF).en_US
dc.creatorMURPHY, JAMES SAMUEL.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMURPHY, JAMES SAMUEL.en_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to provide a starting point in the investigation of loneliness and mainstreamed hearing impaired college students. It was hypothesized that: hearing impaired students would be lonelier than a sample of hearing students (Russell, Peplau & Cutrona, 1980): hard-of-hearing students would be lonelier than deaf students: freshmen would be lonelier than upper-classmen: males would be lonelier than females: satisfaction with parental and peer relationships would relate inversely to loneliness: adjustment to disability would relate inversely to loneliness: comfort with speech for hard-of-hearing students and comfort with sign language for deaf students would relate inversely to loneliness. One hundred seventy volunteer subjects were drawn from eight mainstream colleges/universities. The questionnaire contained the Revised UCLA Loneliness scale (Russell, Peplau & Cutrona, 1980) as the measure of loneliness. The representativeness of the sample was supported. The validity of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale as a measure of loneliness for this population was discussed. Hearing impaired students were found to be more lonely than the hearing sample. Questions raised by this finding were discussed. The finding of no difference between mean loneliness scores in terms of the hard-of-hearing/deaf dichotomy, by year in school and by gender, were discussed. The inverse correlations that were found between individual loneliness scores and satisfaction with parental and peer relationships, adjustment to disability and comfort with speech and sign language were discussed in terms of practical significance. Conclusions and recommendations were made and caution was advised in the use of the Revised UCLA Loneliness Scale with other hearing impaired samples.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613442en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697291730en_US
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