TRANSFERABILITY OF COMPUTER SIMULATED TROUBLESHOOTING SKILLS TO THE ACTUAL EQUIPMENT.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188151
Title:
TRANSFERABILITY OF COMPUTER SIMULATED TROUBLESHOOTING SKILLS TO THE ACTUAL EQUIPMENT.
Author:
Kelley, William Laurence
Issue Date:
1986
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study looks into the ability of computer systems, using both video disc images and overlay graphics, to replicate the Army's new M1 tank, so that soldiers using a light pen and simulated test equipment can effectively troubleshoot the tank, using only the technical manual and video terminal display. The computer trained students were then compared with an untrained control group to see if the simulated "hands-on" skills could be effectively transferred to the actual M1 tank during a real troubleshooting exercise. Students' attitudes were also sampled to provide an affective evaluation of the troubleshooting simulation. Research reveals that computer-assisted instruction has had some success in training electrical troubleshooting. The need to train soldiers in mechanical maintenance and the high cost of using the real tank system as a teaching aid led to this study of using computer technology as a cost effective alternative. An analysis of variance showed a significant difference between the training group and the control group in the number of errors made and the number of correct steps per minute at the p > .05 level. An additional test showed that skills learned could be further transferred to a similar, but untrained task on the tank. Students' affective responses indicated that they enjoyed learning from the computer simulation. This technique may have a major implication for civilian education as well. It could be possible to use this interactive video/computer technique to teach 'hands-on' tasks, ranging from chemistry lab experiments to overhauling an automotive transmission. Students could simulate selected tasks, equipment, supplies, and procedures repeatedly to gain mastery in complete safety without consuming valuable resources. Student performance on the computer terminal has been shown to be directly transferable to the actual equipment, and the substitute computer training has been acknowledged by the students as being an enjoyable and worthwhile experience.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Computer simulation.; Occupational training -- Computer-assisted instruction.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Allen, Paul M.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTRANSFERABILITY OF COMPUTER SIMULATED TROUBLESHOOTING SKILLS TO THE ACTUAL EQUIPMENT.en_US
dc.creatorKelley, William Laurenceen_US
dc.contributor.authorKelley, William Laurenceen_US
dc.date.issued1986en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study looks into the ability of computer systems, using both video disc images and overlay graphics, to replicate the Army's new M1 tank, so that soldiers using a light pen and simulated test equipment can effectively troubleshoot the tank, using only the technical manual and video terminal display. The computer trained students were then compared with an untrained control group to see if the simulated "hands-on" skills could be effectively transferred to the actual M1 tank during a real troubleshooting exercise. Students' attitudes were also sampled to provide an affective evaluation of the troubleshooting simulation. Research reveals that computer-assisted instruction has had some success in training electrical troubleshooting. The need to train soldiers in mechanical maintenance and the high cost of using the real tank system as a teaching aid led to this study of using computer technology as a cost effective alternative. An analysis of variance showed a significant difference between the training group and the control group in the number of errors made and the number of correct steps per minute at the p > .05 level. An additional test showed that skills learned could be further transferred to a similar, but untrained task on the tank. Students' affective responses indicated that they enjoyed learning from the computer simulation. This technique may have a major implication for civilian education as well. It could be possible to use this interactive video/computer technique to teach 'hands-on' tasks, ranging from chemistry lab experiments to overhauling an automotive transmission. Students could simulate selected tasks, equipment, supplies, and procedures repeatedly to gain mastery in complete safety without consuming valuable resources. Student performance on the computer terminal has been shown to be directly transferable to the actual equipment, and the substitute computer training has been acknowledged by the students as being an enjoyable and worthwhile experience.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectComputer simulation.en_US
dc.subjectOccupational training -- Computer-assisted instruction.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorAllen, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNelson, Lawrenceen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8613436en_US
dc.identifier.oclc697291867en_US
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