EFFECTS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL DISCOVERY LEARNING EXPERIENCES ON PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE CHEMISTRY.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188136
Title:
EFFECTS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL DISCOVERY LEARNING EXPERIENCES ON PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE CHEMISTRY.
Author:
WILSON, DONALD RAY, SR.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to assess the extent of discovery learning opportunities in Arizona secondary chemistry classrooms and to determine their relationship to performance in selected areas of freshman college chemistry at the University of Arizona. For the purpose of this study two questionnaires were developed, one to gather data relating to students' participation in discovery learning activities in high school chemistry and the other to assess their use of learning resources at the University of Arizona. Interviews were conducted with 15 volunteers from the subjects of this study. The information provided by these volunteers concerning their high school chemistry background was consistent with information obtained from the questionnaires. Examination and laboratory scores were obtained from the records of the chemistry department, to assess student performance in lecture and laboratory. The students' responses on the Learning Activities Questionnaire were used to form a discovery index score, which was correlated with college chemistry examination scores, college laboratory scores, and student-reported use of learning resources. The lack of relationship between the discovery index scores and college chemistry examination scores was indicated by a partial correlation of -.10 which was not statistically significant at the .05 level. A statistically significant partial correlation of .20 indicated the discovery index scores were related to college laboratory scores. No significant relationship was found between discovery index scores and students' use of learning resources at the University as indicated by the Pearson correlation of .15, which was not significant at the .05 level.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Learning by discovery.; Chemistry -- Study and teaching (Secondary); Chemistry -- Study and teaching (Higher)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Secondary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEFFECTS OF SECONDARY SCHOOL DISCOVERY LEARNING EXPERIENCES ON PERFORMANCE IN COLLEGE CHEMISTRY.en_US
dc.creatorWILSON, DONALD RAY, SR.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWILSON, DONALD RAY, SR.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to assess the extent of discovery learning opportunities in Arizona secondary chemistry classrooms and to determine their relationship to performance in selected areas of freshman college chemistry at the University of Arizona. For the purpose of this study two questionnaires were developed, one to gather data relating to students' participation in discovery learning activities in high school chemistry and the other to assess their use of learning resources at the University of Arizona. Interviews were conducted with 15 volunteers from the subjects of this study. The information provided by these volunteers concerning their high school chemistry background was consistent with information obtained from the questionnaires. Examination and laboratory scores were obtained from the records of the chemistry department, to assess student performance in lecture and laboratory. The students' responses on the Learning Activities Questionnaire were used to form a discovery index score, which was correlated with college chemistry examination scores, college laboratory scores, and student-reported use of learning resources. The lack of relationship between the discovery index scores and college chemistry examination scores was indicated by a partial correlation of -.10 which was not statistically significant at the .05 level. A statistically significant partial correlation of .20 indicated the discovery index scores were related to college laboratory scores. No significant relationship was found between discovery index scores and students' use of learning resources at the University as indicated by the Pearson correlation of .15, which was not significant at the .05 level.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectLearning by discovery.en_US
dc.subjectChemistry -- Study and teaching (Secondary)en_US
dc.subjectChemistry -- Study and teaching (Higher)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBarnes, William D.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBowen, Lindaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLeson, Robert J.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217484en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681774340en_US
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