Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188114
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD SEXUAL EXPERIENCE ON PERSONALITY.
Author:
WETMORE, RALPH HIGGINS, II.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to determine whether or not adults who were child incest participants exhibited greater personality adjustment problems than adults who were not child incest participants. The sample consisted of undergraduate students of The University of Arizona who had volunteered to participate in the study. Each student completed the Personal Orientation Inventory as a measure of personality adjustments, and a questionnaire adapted from the David Finkelhor Questionnaire, which placed each respondent into one of four groups. Group 1 respondents reported having had a childhood sexual experience with another child (a friend or a sibling). Group 2 respondents reported having had a childhood sexual experience with an adult who was not a family member. Group 3 respondents, the child incest participants, reported having had a childhood sexual experience with an adult who was a family member. Group 4 respondents reported having had no childhood sexual experiences. The data was analyzed in two 4 x 2 factorial analyses of variance. The P.O.I. scale scores and subscale scores were the dependent measures of personality adjustment. The independent measures of the first analysis were group membership and gender; of the second analysis, group membership and age. No statistically significant differences among the groups were found on any of the eight P.O.I. scale scores. There were statistically significant effects due to gender on three of the eight P.O.I. scales, females tending to score higher than males. The one exception to that trend was on the Time Competent scale, on which the males of Group 3 scored higher than the females of Group 3. Although that reversal trend occurred, there were no statistically significant interaction effects between group membership and gender. There were statistically significant effects due to age on two of the eight P.O.I. scales, older persons tending to score higher than younger persons. The one exception to this trend was on the Spontaneity subscale, on which the younger persons of Group 4 scored higher than the older persons. This reversal did result in a statistically significant interaction effect between group membership and age. The results of this study, although limited in scope, indicate that not all adults who were child incest participants exhibit greater personality adjustment problems than adults who were not child incest participants.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Child sexual abuse.; Incest.; Sexually abused children.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Christensen, Oscar

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF EARLY CHILDHOOD SEXUAL EXPERIENCE ON PERSONALITY.en_US
dc.creatorWETMORE, RALPH HIGGINS, II.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWETMORE, RALPH HIGGINS, II.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to determine whether or not adults who were child incest participants exhibited greater personality adjustment problems than adults who were not child incest participants. The sample consisted of undergraduate students of The University of Arizona who had volunteered to participate in the study. Each student completed the Personal Orientation Inventory as a measure of personality adjustments, and a questionnaire adapted from the David Finkelhor Questionnaire, which placed each respondent into one of four groups. Group 1 respondents reported having had a childhood sexual experience with another child (a friend or a sibling). Group 2 respondents reported having had a childhood sexual experience with an adult who was not a family member. Group 3 respondents, the child incest participants, reported having had a childhood sexual experience with an adult who was a family member. Group 4 respondents reported having had no childhood sexual experiences. The data was analyzed in two 4 x 2 factorial analyses of variance. The P.O.I. scale scores and subscale scores were the dependent measures of personality adjustment. The independent measures of the first analysis were group membership and gender; of the second analysis, group membership and age. No statistically significant differences among the groups were found on any of the eight P.O.I. scale scores. There were statistically significant effects due to gender on three of the eight P.O.I. scales, females tending to score higher than males. The one exception to that trend was on the Time Competent scale, on which the males of Group 3 scored higher than the females of Group 3. Although that reversal trend occurred, there were no statistically significant interaction effects between group membership and gender. There were statistically significant effects due to age on two of the eight P.O.I. scales, older persons tending to score higher than younger persons. The one exception to this trend was on the Spontaneity subscale, on which the younger persons of Group 4 scored higher than the older persons. This reversal did result in a statistically significant interaction effect between group membership and age. The results of this study, although limited in scope, indicate that not all adults who were child incest participants exhibit greater personality adjustment problems than adults who were not child incest participants.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectChild sexual abuse.en_US
dc.subjectIncest.en_US
dc.subjectSexually abused children.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorChristensen, Oscaren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217482en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681974165en_US
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