PHILANTHROPY AS A VOICE MECHANISM: A STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL FOUNDATIONS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188083
Title:
PHILANTHROPY AS A VOICE MECHANISM: A STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL FOUNDATIONS.
Author:
WORTHINGTON, GWEN GLASEMAN.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The purpose of this study was to find out under what conditions people would be willing to donate money to public education; and to find out if foundations as an alternative for financial support, are an option for the schools. The study researched two primary questions dealing with individual's willingness to give, a voice factor, and the conditions under which people will philanthropically support public education, a choice factor rooted in exchange theory. The data was collected by structured, open-ended interviews with a selected sample of thirty residents of the subject school district. The sample included fifteen residents who supported a recent, failed budget override effort in the subject district, and fifteen residents who did not support the override. The data was qualitatively evaluated to derive answers to the study's research questions. Analysis of the data found that eighty-three percent of the respondents would conditionally donate money to public education through a foundation. One of the findings was the respondents' desire to have a voice in the functioning of the system through controlling their donations by manner of giving, or through designation of monies by earmarking for specific areas. Among the variables that affected the willingness to allocate private money to public education, perception of quality was the primary factor that was directly responsible for the decisions of the respondents. Conceptually this study looked at voice as an indicia of involvement, and as a way to reverse organizational exit. The ultimate goal of involvement becomes commitment or loyalty. Foundations may precipitate a process of increased community involvement in public schools.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Education -- Finance.; Endowments.; Charity organization.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Foundations and Administration; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sacken, Donal

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titlePHILANTHROPY AS A VOICE MECHANISM: A STUDY OF THE EFFICACY OF PUBLIC SCHOOL FOUNDATIONS.en_US
dc.creatorWORTHINGTON, GWEN GLASEMAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWORTHINGTON, GWEN GLASEMAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe purpose of this study was to find out under what conditions people would be willing to donate money to public education; and to find out if foundations as an alternative for financial support, are an option for the schools. The study researched two primary questions dealing with individual's willingness to give, a voice factor, and the conditions under which people will philanthropically support public education, a choice factor rooted in exchange theory. The data was collected by structured, open-ended interviews with a selected sample of thirty residents of the subject school district. The sample included fifteen residents who supported a recent, failed budget override effort in the subject district, and fifteen residents who did not support the override. The data was qualitatively evaluated to derive answers to the study's research questions. Analysis of the data found that eighty-three percent of the respondents would conditionally donate money to public education through a foundation. One of the findings was the respondents' desire to have a voice in the functioning of the system through controlling their donations by manner of giving, or through designation of monies by earmarking for specific areas. Among the variables that affected the willingness to allocate private money to public education, perception of quality was the primary factor that was directly responsible for the decisions of the respondents. Conceptually this study looked at voice as an indicia of involvement, and as a way to reverse organizational exit. The ultimate goal of involvement becomes commitment or loyalty. Foundations may precipitate a process of increased community involvement in public schools.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducation -- Finance.en_US
dc.subjectEndowments.en_US
dc.subjectCharity organization.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Foundations and Administrationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSacken, Donalen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCooper, Ruthen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberCarlson, Bethen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8529413en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696642004en_US
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