EXTINCTION OF NEAR INFRARED SOLAR RADIATION AS A MEANS FOR REMOTE DETERMINATION OF ATMOSPHERIC WATER VAPOR.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188078
Title:
EXTINCTION OF NEAR INFRARED SOLAR RADIATION AS A MEANS FOR REMOTE DETERMINATION OF ATMOSPHERIC WATER VAPOR.
Author:
THOMASON, LARRY WILLIS.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
A computationally efficient and accurate model is derived for the calculation of the atmospheric transmittance along inhomogeneous paths and within spectral bands dominated by molecular line absorption. It is a Stieltjes integration of transmission weighted by the frequency of occurrence of absorption coefficient within the band. Path inhomogeneitites are accounted for by assuming that the rank of absorption coefficient at any wavenumber is independent of temperature and pressure. The technique is then applied to the ground based radiometric determination of precipitable water. It is found that the technique predicts the behavior of the ρστ water vapor absorption band very well. An RMS disagreement of 11% is found when the model predictions are compared to radiosonde determinations of precipitable water. The model is also applied to the determination of vertical water vapor distributions in the stratosphere given measured effective optical depths as a function of tangent height from a limb scanning satellite. A new iterative reduction technique is introduced which incorporates the transmission model and it is shown to be both numerically stable and rapidly convergent. A comparison of the results with an independent reduction technique shows good overall agreement with a small systematic difference above 20 km. The uncertainty in the measurements, which yields solution uncertainties on the order of 30%, renders this systematic difference unimportant.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Water vapor, Atmospheric -- Measurement.; Solar radiation.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Atmospheric Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Herman, Ben

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEXTINCTION OF NEAR INFRARED SOLAR RADIATION AS A MEANS FOR REMOTE DETERMINATION OF ATMOSPHERIC WATER VAPOR.en_US
dc.creatorTHOMASON, LARRY WILLIS.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTHOMASON, LARRY WILLIS.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractA computationally efficient and accurate model is derived for the calculation of the atmospheric transmittance along inhomogeneous paths and within spectral bands dominated by molecular line absorption. It is a Stieltjes integration of transmission weighted by the frequency of occurrence of absorption coefficient within the band. Path inhomogeneitites are accounted for by assuming that the rank of absorption coefficient at any wavenumber is independent of temperature and pressure. The technique is then applied to the ground based radiometric determination of precipitable water. It is found that the technique predicts the behavior of the ρστ water vapor absorption band very well. An RMS disagreement of 11% is found when the model predictions are compared to radiosonde determinations of precipitable water. The model is also applied to the determination of vertical water vapor distributions in the stratosphere given measured effective optical depths as a function of tangent height from a limb scanning satellite. A new iterative reduction technique is introduced which incorporates the transmission model and it is shown to be both numerically stable and rapidly convergent. A comparison of the results with an independent reduction technique shows good overall agreement with a small systematic difference above 20 km. The uncertainty in the measurements, which yields solution uncertainties on the order of 30%, renders this systematic difference unimportant.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectWater vapor, Atmospheric -- Measurement.en_US
dc.subjectSolar radiation.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAtmospheric Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorHerman, Benen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8529410en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696797457en_US
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