COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF THERMIONIC INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ACTIVE DEVICES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188077
Title:
COMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF THERMIONIC INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ACTIVE DEVICES.
Author:
SCHOENEMAN, DONALD WARREN.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Two computer-aided design methods are described in this dissertation for the design of Thermionic Integrated Circuits (TIC). Such circuits combine vacuum tube techniques with modern integrated circuit techniques to produce microminiature vacuum tube circuits, with possibly hundreds of vacuum triodes on a single substrate. The first method described in the line charge approximation technique in which the TIC devices are modelled as collections of line charges. A TIC is produced by evaporating metal electrodes on one or two sapphire substrates. The entire structure is heated to about 850°C so that electrons are emitted from the cathode electrodes to travel to the plate electrodes as in a conventional vacuum triode. The line charge approximation method is easy to implement and provides a simple means of satisfying the sapphire dielectric boundary conditions of the TIC basic problems, which are electrostatics problems since space charge effects are neglected. The method requires only a single matrix inversion and is a finite element Green's function approach. The method uses no iteration as in previous TIC analysis methods. Later as the development of TIC devices proceeded further it was found that conducting shields had to be placed over the unused sapphire surface so that the basic problem became a metal box problem. For this case a second method was developed called the step and ramp function method in which each electrode is modelled by a step function, which is the electric field solution for a potential step on a zero potential boundary. A superposition of these step functions models the TIC electrodes. The method provides direct calculation of the electric fields from equations and requires no iteration or matrix inversion. The potential variation between electrodes is modelled by linear potential functions called ramps. A superposition of steps and ramps completely specifies a TIC structure. The method does not solve for the case of electrodes which are elevated above substrates. For this case a modified line charge method was developed but not implemented.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Integrated circuits -- Design and construction.; Triodes.; Computer-aided design.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Electrical and Computer Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kerwin, William J.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleCOMPUTER-AIDED DESIGN OF THERMIONIC INTEGRATED CIRCUIT ACTIVE DEVICES.en_US
dc.creatorSCHOENEMAN, DONALD WARREN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSCHOENEMAN, DONALD WARREN.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractTwo computer-aided design methods are described in this dissertation for the design of Thermionic Integrated Circuits (TIC). Such circuits combine vacuum tube techniques with modern integrated circuit techniques to produce microminiature vacuum tube circuits, with possibly hundreds of vacuum triodes on a single substrate. The first method described in the line charge approximation technique in which the TIC devices are modelled as collections of line charges. A TIC is produced by evaporating metal electrodes on one or two sapphire substrates. The entire structure is heated to about 850°C so that electrons are emitted from the cathode electrodes to travel to the plate electrodes as in a conventional vacuum triode. The line charge approximation method is easy to implement and provides a simple means of satisfying the sapphire dielectric boundary conditions of the TIC basic problems, which are electrostatics problems since space charge effects are neglected. The method requires only a single matrix inversion and is a finite element Green's function approach. The method uses no iteration as in previous TIC analysis methods. Later as the development of TIC devices proceeded further it was found that conducting shields had to be placed over the unused sapphire surface so that the basic problem became a metal box problem. For this case a second method was developed called the step and ramp function method in which each electrode is modelled by a step function, which is the electric field solution for a potential step on a zero potential boundary. A superposition of these step functions models the TIC electrodes. The method provides direct calculation of the electric fields from equations and requires no iteration or matrix inversion. The potential variation between electrodes is modelled by linear potential functions called ramps. A superposition of steps and ramps completely specifies a TIC structure. The method does not solve for the case of electrodes which are elevated above substrates. For this case a modified line charge method was developed but not implemented.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectIntegrated circuits -- Design and construction.en_US
dc.subjectTriodes.en_US
dc.subjectComputer-aided design.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineElectrical and Computer Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKerwin, William J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHamilton, Douglas J.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRaymond, L. S.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8529409en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696796189en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.