INFLUENCE OF PLANTING AND INFESTATION DATES ON FALL ARMYWORM DAMAGE TO SOME YEMENI SORGHUM VARIETIES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188063
Title:
INFLUENCE OF PLANTING AND INFESTATION DATES ON FALL ARMYWORM DAMAGE TO SOME YEMENI SORGHUM VARIETIES.
Author:
AL-HUMIARI, AMIN ABDALLAH.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The Fall Armyworm is a serious pest of many crops throughout most of the Western Hemisphere particularly those belonging to the family Gramineae. This pest is usually controlled by insecticides which, however, cause many health and environmental problems. Although a rich bank of sorgum germplasm occurs in Yemen, no effort has been made to identify the Yemeni cultivars which might express resistance to armyworm attack. There is very little information to show at what time of the growing season and at what planting stage the sorghum cultivars are most susceptible to armyworms. Therefore, eight Yemeni and two American sorghum cultivars were planted in Tucson, Arizona, during 1983 and 1984. The experimental design was a randomized complete block arranged in split-split plots with four replications. The main plots were the varieties, and subplots were two planting dates and two infestation times. The plants were artificially infested with laboratory reared, first instar larvae. Infestation consisted of five larvae per plant in 1983 and ten in 1984. Results demonstrate the 'IBB' and 'TURBA' received the least leaf damage and 'SGIRL-MR1' and 'ALBAIDA' received the most in 1983. However, during 1984, 'TURBA' and 'HAIDRAN' showed the greatest degree of resistance and 'SGIRL-MR1', 'AMRAN', 'ALMAHWIT', and 'ALBAIDA' the least.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Fall armyworm.; Sorghum -- Diseases and pests.; Sorghum -- Planting time.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Entomology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Nutting, William L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleINFLUENCE OF PLANTING AND INFESTATION DATES ON FALL ARMYWORM DAMAGE TO SOME YEMENI SORGHUM VARIETIES.en_US
dc.creatorAL-HUMIARI, AMIN ABDALLAH.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAL-HUMIARI, AMIN ABDALLAH.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe Fall Armyworm is a serious pest of many crops throughout most of the Western Hemisphere particularly those belonging to the family Gramineae. This pest is usually controlled by insecticides which, however, cause many health and environmental problems. Although a rich bank of sorgum germplasm occurs in Yemen, no effort has been made to identify the Yemeni cultivars which might express resistance to armyworm attack. There is very little information to show at what time of the growing season and at what planting stage the sorghum cultivars are most susceptible to armyworms. Therefore, eight Yemeni and two American sorghum cultivars were planted in Tucson, Arizona, during 1983 and 1984. The experimental design was a randomized complete block arranged in split-split plots with four replications. The main plots were the varieties, and subplots were two planting dates and two infestation times. The plants were artificially infested with laboratory reared, first instar larvae. Infestation consisted of five larvae per plant in 1983 and ten in 1984. Results demonstrate the 'IBB' and 'TURBA' received the least leaf damage and 'SGIRL-MR1' and 'ALBAIDA' received the most in 1983. However, during 1984, 'TURBA' and 'HAIDRAN' showed the greatest degree of resistance and 'SGIRL-MR1', 'AMRAN', 'ALMAHWIT', and 'ALBAIDA' the least.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFall armyworm.en_US
dc.subjectSorghum -- Diseases and pests.en_US
dc.subjectSorghum -- Planting time.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEntomologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorNutting, William L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWerner, Floyden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberSmith, Robert L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMcCormick, Floyden_US
dc.contributor.committeememberZurbrick, Philipen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8529394en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696790141en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.