THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TEACHER-STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS AS PERCEIVED BY MEXICAN-AMERICAN LEADERS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188058
Title:
THE SIGNIFICANCE OF TEACHER-STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS AS PERCEIVED BY MEXICAN-AMERICAN LEADERS.
Author:
TRUJILLO, AVELINA CHAVEZ.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation sought the perceptions of a selected group of Mexican-American community leaders in Tucson, Arizona, concerning their recollected classroom relationships with their teachers. The investigation proceeded on the basis of a three-part theoretical framework drawn from the literature of psychology, anthropology, and education. The theory included the following: (1) Perceptual Processes; (2) Cultural Processes; and (3) Interpersonal Processes. An interview schedule, based on the elements of the theoretical framework, was developed employing a Likert type scale together with an open-ended comment format. Twenty Mexican-American community leaders were identified and interviewed in depth regarding the perceived relationships that they recalled having had with their respective teachers. Among the findings, the following appeared to be most significant: (1) the participants generally agreed that their teachers were aware of them; (2) the participants reported perceiving that their teachers had accepted them; (3) the participants agreed that their teachers had generally not accepted most aspects of their bicultural being. They reported perceiving that their teachers' thrust appeared to have been toward assimilation; (4) the participants reported that their teachers seemed not to have cared sufficiently to communicate to them that their bicultural identities were important; (5) the participants reported that their teachers had not encouraged them to make choices in becoming independent persons. They tended to report that their teachers had lowered expectations for them and therefore had not adequately challenged them; and (6) the participants perceived that their teachers had not extended themselves to positively support their cultural identities.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Teacher-student relationships -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Teachers of Mexican Americans -- Arizona -- Tucson.; Student evaluation of teachers.; Mexican Americans -- Education -- Arizona -- Tucson.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Secondary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Barnes, William

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE SIGNIFICANCE OF TEACHER-STUDENT RELATIONSHIPS AS PERCEIVED BY MEXICAN-AMERICAN LEADERS.en_US
dc.creatorTRUJILLO, AVELINA CHAVEZ.en_US
dc.contributor.authorTRUJILLO, AVELINA CHAVEZ.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation sought the perceptions of a selected group of Mexican-American community leaders in Tucson, Arizona, concerning their recollected classroom relationships with their teachers. The investigation proceeded on the basis of a three-part theoretical framework drawn from the literature of psychology, anthropology, and education. The theory included the following: (1) Perceptual Processes; (2) Cultural Processes; and (3) Interpersonal Processes. An interview schedule, based on the elements of the theoretical framework, was developed employing a Likert type scale together with an open-ended comment format. Twenty Mexican-American community leaders were identified and interviewed in depth regarding the perceived relationships that they recalled having had with their respective teachers. Among the findings, the following appeared to be most significant: (1) the participants generally agreed that their teachers were aware of them; (2) the participants reported perceiving that their teachers had accepted them; (3) the participants agreed that their teachers had generally not accepted most aspects of their bicultural being. They reported perceiving that their teachers' thrust appeared to have been toward assimilation; (4) the participants reported that their teachers seemed not to have cared sufficiently to communicate to them that their bicultural identities were important; (5) the participants reported that their teachers had not encouraged them to make choices in becoming independent persons. They tended to report that their teachers had lowered expectations for them and therefore had not adequately challenged them; and (6) the participants perceived that their teachers had not extended themselves to positively support their cultural identities.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectTeacher-student relationships -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers of Mexican Americans -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
dc.subjectStudent evaluation of teachers.en_US
dc.subjectMexican Americans -- Education -- Arizona -- Tucson.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorBarnes, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHoward, Leighen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDonald, Clarken_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217477en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681772114en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.