THE EFFECT OF THE NATIVE LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH DURING INTERACTIONAL GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH INDONESIAN AND MALAYSIAN STUDENTS, AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THIS METHOD FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS FROM NON-WESTERN COUNTRIES.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188050
Title:
THE EFFECT OF THE NATIVE LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH DURING INTERACTIONAL GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH INDONESIAN AND MALAYSIAN STUDENTS, AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THIS METHOD FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS FROM NON-WESTERN COUNTRIES.
Author:
HADIYONO, JOHANA ENDANG PRAWITASARI.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Language and treatment modality are important variables in conducting psychotherapy with students from non-Western countries. Both variables might also have significant impact on therapeutic outcome. Foreign students in America speak at least two languages, and utilizing either their native language or English during sessions might result in different kinds of emotional expressiveness. Indonesian and Malaysian students are from countries where it is uncommon to express emotions publicly. Since language is a part of culture, using English might facilitate a distancing from their cultural context, and might also facilitate more verbal expressions of emotion. On the other hand, using their native language might facilitate a warm and "at home" atmosphere. The purpose of this dissertation is to study the effect of native language and English during interactional group psychotherapy with Indonesian and Malaysian students, and to assess the efficacy of this modality with foreign students. Yalom's interactional group psychotherapy was used with a group of Indonesian, a group of Malaysian, and a group of international students. These three treatment groups were compared to a group of international students who served as a control group. English and the native language were used alternately during the sessions with the Indonesian and Malaysian groups. Only English was used during the sessions with the international student groups. Objective measurements used were the Profile of Mood States, the Personal Orientation Inventory, the Group Environment Scale, the Group Climate Questionnaire, and the Subjective Evaluation Ratings Scale. Subjective measurement was independent judges. Results indicated that Indonesians and Malaysians rated themselves as significantly more active during sessions in English than during sessions in their native language. Raters perceived the Indonesian and Malaysian groups as more cohesive when sessions were conducted in the native language than when conducted in English. This study also indicated that interactional group psychotherapy was effective for foreign students, with some limitations. This treatment method was effective in improving mood states and personality profiles. The method was most effective for the Malaysians. In addition, this study also supported the notion that insight awareness therapy is effective for YAVIS (young, attractive, verbal, intelligent, successful) clients.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Native language -- Psychological aspects.; English language -- Psychological aspects.; Psychotherapy -- Cross-cultural studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Kahn, Marvin W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECT OF THE NATIVE LANGUAGE AND ENGLISH DURING INTERACTIONAL GROUP PSYCHOTHERAPY WITH INDONESIAN AND MALAYSIAN STUDENTS, AND THE EFFECTIVENESS OF THIS METHOD FOR FOREIGN STUDENTS FROM NON-WESTERN COUNTRIES.en_US
dc.creatorHADIYONO, JOHANA ENDANG PRAWITASARI.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHADIYONO, JOHANA ENDANG PRAWITASARI.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractLanguage and treatment modality are important variables in conducting psychotherapy with students from non-Western countries. Both variables might also have significant impact on therapeutic outcome. Foreign students in America speak at least two languages, and utilizing either their native language or English during sessions might result in different kinds of emotional expressiveness. Indonesian and Malaysian students are from countries where it is uncommon to express emotions publicly. Since language is a part of culture, using English might facilitate a distancing from their cultural context, and might also facilitate more verbal expressions of emotion. On the other hand, using their native language might facilitate a warm and "at home" atmosphere. The purpose of this dissertation is to study the effect of native language and English during interactional group psychotherapy with Indonesian and Malaysian students, and to assess the efficacy of this modality with foreign students. Yalom's interactional group psychotherapy was used with a group of Indonesian, a group of Malaysian, and a group of international students. These three treatment groups were compared to a group of international students who served as a control group. English and the native language were used alternately during the sessions with the Indonesian and Malaysian groups. Only English was used during the sessions with the international student groups. Objective measurements used were the Profile of Mood States, the Personal Orientation Inventory, the Group Environment Scale, the Group Climate Questionnaire, and the Subjective Evaluation Ratings Scale. Subjective measurement was independent judges. Results indicated that Indonesians and Malaysians rated themselves as significantly more active during sessions in English than during sessions in their native language. Raters perceived the Indonesian and Malaysian groups as more cohesive when sessions were conducted in the native language than when conducted in English. This study also indicated that interactional group psychotherapy was effective for foreign students, with some limitations. This treatment method was effective in improving mood states and personality profiles. The method was most effective for the Malaysians. In addition, this study also supported the notion that insight awareness therapy is effective for YAVIS (young, attractive, verbal, intelligent, successful) clients.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectNative language -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectEnglish language -- Psychological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectPsychotherapy -- Cross-cultural studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePsychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorKahn, Marvin W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMadison, Peteren_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWrenn, Boben_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHertz, Lewen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8526314en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696637525en_US
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