Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188038
Title:
NO NUKES: A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MUSIC MESSAGES.
Author:
RODGERS, STEVEN DEAN.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study investigated the antinuclear musical compositions that occurred between the dropping of the first nuclear detonation device in 1945 and the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear energy facility near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. This study utilized a framework provided by Kenneth Burke in that the five areas of the pentad--scene, agents, acts, agencies and purposes--were investigated in relation to one another. Each of these areas was investigated with regard to the unique nature of the medium of popular song operating as a cultural key. The scenic analysis centered upon the cause of the exigency that brought about the antinuclear music. As the uses of nuclear energy changed from military uses to energy generation, the musical and lyrical content also changed. Special consideration of the Musicians United for Safe Energy movement was presented in an historical context, noting antecedent movement activity. Other positive, negative and neutral agents were also considered. The specific acts of the nuclear age are divided into actual physical, historically verifiable actions with regard to nuclear activity and in incipient action as presented through the lyrics of the musical compositions. Consideration of the agencies used by the positive agents centered around the concept of identification as essential to the movement against nuclear energy. This identification was considered as "Identification Of," "Identification With," and a third type of "Corporate Identification," in that conflicting identifications may occur. The purposes of the antinuclear movement were to fight the proliferation of nuclear arms and energy generation facilities through the cohesive force of music to mobilize the youth on behalf of the antinuclear movement, to provide a sense of belonging and participation in peer group activity, and to provide a release for the youth of this era of history. The conclusions of this research indicate that the antinuclear musical activity has provided the vocabulary, the imagery and the syntax with which the public addressed nuclear energy when the Three Mile Island episode solidified public opinion on the issue.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Rhetoric.; Oral communication.; Music -- Physiological aspects.; Antinuclear movement.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Speech Communication; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Committee Chair:
King, Andrew A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleNO NUKES: A RHETORICAL ANALYSIS OF MUSIC MESSAGES.en_US
dc.creatorRODGERS, STEVEN DEAN.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRODGERS, STEVEN DEAN.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the antinuclear musical compositions that occurred between the dropping of the first nuclear detonation device in 1945 and the accident at the Three Mile Island nuclear energy facility near Harrisburg, Pennsylvania. This study utilized a framework provided by Kenneth Burke in that the five areas of the pentad--scene, agents, acts, agencies and purposes--were investigated in relation to one another. Each of these areas was investigated with regard to the unique nature of the medium of popular song operating as a cultural key. The scenic analysis centered upon the cause of the exigency that brought about the antinuclear music. As the uses of nuclear energy changed from military uses to energy generation, the musical and lyrical content also changed. Special consideration of the Musicians United for Safe Energy movement was presented in an historical context, noting antecedent movement activity. Other positive, negative and neutral agents were also considered. The specific acts of the nuclear age are divided into actual physical, historically verifiable actions with regard to nuclear activity and in incipient action as presented through the lyrics of the musical compositions. Consideration of the agencies used by the positive agents centered around the concept of identification as essential to the movement against nuclear energy. This identification was considered as "Identification Of," "Identification With," and a third type of "Corporate Identification," in that conflicting identifications may occur. The purposes of the antinuclear movement were to fight the proliferation of nuclear arms and energy generation facilities through the cohesive force of music to mobilize the youth on behalf of the antinuclear movement, to provide a sense of belonging and participation in peer group activity, and to provide a release for the youth of this era of history. The conclusions of this research indicate that the antinuclear musical activity has provided the vocabulary, the imagery and the syntax with which the public addressed nuclear energy when the Three Mile Island episode solidified public opinion on the issue.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRhetoric.en_US
dc.subjectOral communication.en_US
dc.subjectMusic -- Physiological aspects.en_US
dc.subjectAntinuclear movement.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSpeech Communicationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.chairKing, Andrew A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberEwbank, Henry Leeen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBailey, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberWilliams, David A.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLouie, Erikaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8525603en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696627842en_US
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