DECODING DESIGNS: THE LATE THIRD MILLENNIUM B.C. POTTERY FROM JEBEL QAᶜAQIR (ETHNOARCHAEOLOGY, ISRAEL, BRONZE AGE, CERAMIC TECHNOLOGY).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188033
Title:
DECODING DESIGNS: THE LATE THIRD MILLENNIUM B.C. POTTERY FROM JEBEL QAᶜAQIR (ETHNOARCHAEOLOGY, ISRAEL, BRONZE AGE, CERAMIC TECHNOLOGY).
Author:
LONDON, GLORIA ANNE.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The late third millennium B.C. in Israel until recently was known by funerary deposits only. At Jebel Qaᶜaqir, the domestic and funerary remains provide an unprecedented assemblage and permit a reassessment of Early Bronze IV society and events culminating in the collapse of the Early Bronze III urban centers. Historically, pottery studies have focused on chronological issues. After reviewing the history of ceramic analysis in Israel for the past one hundred years, the Jebel Qaᶜaqir collection is presented. Variation in the manufacturing technique and incised patterns are described in detail for the purpose of identifying the work of individual potters. Ethnoarchaeological research of pottery production, especially the Filipino potters of Paradijon, provide the model for this analysis. The nature of the late third millennium B.C. pastoral nomadic society is examined in terms of subsistence strategies and settlement distribution. Inferences regarding social organization drawn from mortuary practices, settlement types and organization of labor challenge the idea that an egalitarian society persisted. Finally, these results provide a new perspective on the events following the collapse of the third millennium B.C. urban centers and the succeeding era of a non-sedentary lifestyle in Israel. The nomadic pastoralists are considered in their regional setting as an integral, indigenous part of Early Bronze Age society. Rather than viewing the pastoralists as a new phenomenon, they are considered as an ever-present characteristic of the urban hinterland.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Palestine -- Antiquities.; Excavations (Archaeology) -- Israel.; Pottery, Ancient -- Palestine.; Jebel Qa'aqir site (Israel)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Oriental Studies; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleDECODING DESIGNS: THE LATE THIRD MILLENNIUM B.C. POTTERY FROM JEBEL QAᶜAQIR (ETHNOARCHAEOLOGY, ISRAEL, BRONZE AGE, CERAMIC TECHNOLOGY).en_US
dc.creatorLONDON, GLORIA ANNE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLONDON, GLORIA ANNE.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe late third millennium B.C. in Israel until recently was known by funerary deposits only. At Jebel Qaᶜaqir, the domestic and funerary remains provide an unprecedented assemblage and permit a reassessment of Early Bronze IV society and events culminating in the collapse of the Early Bronze III urban centers. Historically, pottery studies have focused on chronological issues. After reviewing the history of ceramic analysis in Israel for the past one hundred years, the Jebel Qaᶜaqir collection is presented. Variation in the manufacturing technique and incised patterns are described in detail for the purpose of identifying the work of individual potters. Ethnoarchaeological research of pottery production, especially the Filipino potters of Paradijon, provide the model for this analysis. The nature of the late third millennium B.C. pastoral nomadic society is examined in terms of subsistence strategies and settlement distribution. Inferences regarding social organization drawn from mortuary practices, settlement types and organization of labor challenge the idea that an egalitarian society persisted. Finally, these results provide a new perspective on the events following the collapse of the third millennium B.C. urban centers and the succeeding era of a non-sedentary lifestyle in Israel. The nomadic pastoralists are considered in their regional setting as an integral, indigenous part of Early Bronze Age society. Rather than viewing the pastoralists as a new phenomenon, they are considered as an ever-present characteristic of the urban hinterland.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectPalestine -- Antiquities.en_US
dc.subjectExcavations (Archaeology) -- Israel.en_US
dc.subjectPottery, Ancient -- Palestine.en_US
dc.subjectJebel Qa'aqir site (Israel)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineOriental Studiesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8525598en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696627061en_US
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