STUDENT TELEVISION PRODUCTION: THE EFFECTS ON STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARDS SELF AND OTHERS (HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUTS, MEXICAN AMERICANS, ALTERNATIVE, PERCEPTION, VIDEO).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188031
Title:
STUDENT TELEVISION PRODUCTION: THE EFFECTS ON STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARDS SELF AND OTHERS (HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUTS, MEXICAN AMERICANS, ALTERNATIVE, PERCEPTION, VIDEO).
Author:
EGGERT, VIRGINIA RAE TRAMBLEY.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This investigation attempted to answer the following research questions, based upon student participation in "hands on" television production activities: (1) What shifts in the students' perceived acceptance of themselves occurred, (2) what shifts in the students' perceived acceptance of others occurred, and (3) what shifts in the students' perceived acceptance of school occurred? In seeking answers to the above three questions, the investigator located seven volunteers from a high school dropout retrieval program. As it developed, all of them were of Mexican American heritage. This investigation was based upon a theoretical framework drawn from perceptual psychology, education, and television. The framework consisted of television as a perceptual experience tending to effect acceptance of self, others, and school. A small n research design with multiple measures was used during this investigation. Data were collected with a student self-report measure using a modified Likert-type response mode. Qualitative data were collected from student interviews and investigator observations recorded as fieldnotes. The research results indicated no significant patterns in acceptance of self and others as a group. The qualitative data revealed the variety of individual shifts in acceptance of self, others and school. Certain unanticipated results occurred because the participants were Mexican American. These included cultural-related observations. The data indicated that "hands on" television production activities involve "learning in context" processes which might have important implications for dropout retrieval programs. The investigator recommended further "learning in context" TV or video studies with multicultural groups of students.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
High school students -- Attitudes.; Mexican American youth.; Education -- Simulation methods.; Self-perception.; Television -- Production and direction.; Television in secondary education.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Secondary Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSTUDENT TELEVISION PRODUCTION: THE EFFECTS ON STUDENT ATTITUDES TOWARDS SELF AND OTHERS (HIGH SCHOOL DROPOUTS, MEXICAN AMERICANS, ALTERNATIVE, PERCEPTION, VIDEO).en_US
dc.creatorEGGERT, VIRGINIA RAE TRAMBLEY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEGGERT, VIRGINIA RAE TRAMBLEY.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis investigation attempted to answer the following research questions, based upon student participation in "hands on" television production activities: (1) What shifts in the students' perceived acceptance of themselves occurred, (2) what shifts in the students' perceived acceptance of others occurred, and (3) what shifts in the students' perceived acceptance of school occurred? In seeking answers to the above three questions, the investigator located seven volunteers from a high school dropout retrieval program. As it developed, all of them were of Mexican American heritage. This investigation was based upon a theoretical framework drawn from perceptual psychology, education, and television. The framework consisted of television as a perceptual experience tending to effect acceptance of self, others, and school. A small n research design with multiple measures was used during this investigation. Data were collected with a student self-report measure using a modified Likert-type response mode. Qualitative data were collected from student interviews and investigator observations recorded as fieldnotes. The research results indicated no significant patterns in acceptance of self and others as a group. The qualitative data revealed the variety of individual shifts in acceptance of self, others and school. Certain unanticipated results occurred because the participants were Mexican American. These included cultural-related observations. The data indicated that "hands on" television production activities involve "learning in context" processes which might have important implications for dropout retrieval programs. The investigator recommended further "learning in context" TV or video studies with multicultural groups of students.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHigh school students -- Attitudes.en_US
dc.subjectMexican American youth.en_US
dc.subjectEducation -- Simulation methods.en_US
dc.subjectSelf-perception.en_US
dc.subjectTelevision -- Production and direction.en_US
dc.subjectTelevision in secondary education.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineSecondary Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8525596en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696626026en_US
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