THE IMMEDIATE RECALL OF ENGLISH LECTURE INFORMATION BY NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH AS A FUNCTION OF NOTETAKING (MEMORY, ACADEMIC SKILLS, CROSS-CULTURE, LISTENING COMPREHENSION, POST-SECONDARY).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188030
Title:
THE IMMEDIATE RECALL OF ENGLISH LECTURE INFORMATION BY NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH AS A FUNCTION OF NOTETAKING (MEMORY, ACADEMIC SKILLS, CROSS-CULTURE, LISTENING COMPREHENSION, POST-SECONDARY).
Author:
DUNKEL, PATRICIA GRANEY.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to evaluate the effect of concurrent notetaking and the quality of notes taken on the immediate recall of English lecture information by both native and non-native speakers of English. Additionally, the impact of short-term memory and familiarity with English on lecture information recall was also assessed. The subjects were 136 native speakers and 123 non-native speakers enrolled in Freshman English Composition classes at The University of Arizona. The Digit Span subtest of the WISC-R was administered to obtain a measure of short-term memory. Subjects were randomly assigned to a "listening only" or a "listening and notetaking" condition during a videotaped lecture presentation on the evolution of the Egyptian pyramid structure. Immediately following the lecture, the notes were collected to preclude review, and a 15-item multiple-choice test on lecture concepts and a 15-item multiple-choice test covering lecture details were administered. The data were subjected to multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAS). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was also performed to determine which index/indices of note quality predicted information recall for American and international notetakers. Results indicated that (1) notetakers and non-notetakers did equally well in recalling lecture concepts and details; (2) no significant differences in the test performance of subjects who took "no notes," "low quality notes," "medium quality notes," or "high quality notes" were found; (3) subjects with high short-term memory ability recalled more concept and detail information than subjects with low short-term memory ability; and (4) native speakers of English recalled significantly more of the concepts and details presented in the lecture than non-native speakers. The regression analysis indicated that 4 of the 5 indices of note quality predicted recall performance, but the indices varied according to the kind of information tested and the subjects's ethno-cultural background. Implications concerning the nature of the findings and recommendations for future research were proposed.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Recollection (Psychology); Note-taking.; Learning, Psychology of.; Memory.; Listening.; Cognition and culture.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Educational Psychology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE IMMEDIATE RECALL OF ENGLISH LECTURE INFORMATION BY NATIVE AND NON-NATIVE SPEAKERS OF ENGLISH AS A FUNCTION OF NOTETAKING (MEMORY, ACADEMIC SKILLS, CROSS-CULTURE, LISTENING COMPREHENSION, POST-SECONDARY).en_US
dc.creatorDUNKEL, PATRICIA GRANEY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDUNKEL, PATRICIA GRANEY.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to evaluate the effect of concurrent notetaking and the quality of notes taken on the immediate recall of English lecture information by both native and non-native speakers of English. Additionally, the impact of short-term memory and familiarity with English on lecture information recall was also assessed. The subjects were 136 native speakers and 123 non-native speakers enrolled in Freshman English Composition classes at The University of Arizona. The Digit Span subtest of the WISC-R was administered to obtain a measure of short-term memory. Subjects were randomly assigned to a "listening only" or a "listening and notetaking" condition during a videotaped lecture presentation on the evolution of the Egyptian pyramid structure. Immediately following the lecture, the notes were collected to preclude review, and a 15-item multiple-choice test on lecture concepts and a 15-item multiple-choice test covering lecture details were administered. The data were subjected to multivariate analyses of variance (MANOVAS). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was also performed to determine which index/indices of note quality predicted information recall for American and international notetakers. Results indicated that (1) notetakers and non-notetakers did equally well in recalling lecture concepts and details; (2) no significant differences in the test performance of subjects who took "no notes," "low quality notes," "medium quality notes," or "high quality notes" were found; (3) subjects with high short-term memory ability recalled more concept and detail information than subjects with low short-term memory ability; and (4) native speakers of English recalled significantly more of the concepts and details presented in the lecture than non-native speakers. The regression analysis indicated that 4 of the 5 indices of note quality predicted recall performance, but the indices varied according to the kind of information tested and the subjects's ethno-cultural background. Implications concerning the nature of the findings and recommendations for future research were proposed.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRecollection (Psychology)en_US
dc.subjectNote-taking.en_US
dc.subjectLearning, Psychology of.en_US
dc.subjectMemory.en_US
dc.subjectListening.en_US
dc.subjectCognition and culture.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducational Psychologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8525595en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696625037en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.