A COMPARISON OF POST-SECONDARY EDUCATIONAL PLANS OF BLACK AND WHITE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN 1972 AND 1980.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188014
Title:
A COMPARISON OF POST-SECONDARY EDUCATIONAL PLANS OF BLACK AND WHITE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN 1972 AND 1980.
Author:
SMITH, MICHAEL FRANCIS.
Issue Date:
1982
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The educational plans of black high-school seniors over the past decade were examined and compared to the plans of white students by analyzing selected base-year data from The National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 and High School and Beyond: A National Longitudinal Study for the 1980s. Chi-square was used to detect significant changes between survey years. Expectations to participate in post-secondary education were essentially the same for all black and white seniors between 1972 and 1980 though black expectations were greater. Among whites, women exceeded men in 1980. When levels of educational expectation were examined, significant differences were apparent for both races. Large declines occurred in the four-year college category though they were partially offset by increases in the graduate school category. Small increases also occurred among both blacks and whites in the community college category. No clear trends were seen in the vocational school category. Black expectations were greater than those of whites in the combined upper two categories with the most striking difference seen among low-aptitude and low-SES students. Immediate plans for two- or four-year college attendance changed significantly for both blacks and whites with more students indicating four-year preference in 1980. Overall, more blacks than whites planned four-year attendance in both survey years and the largest differences between races were found on the low- and middle-aptitude levels. Preferences for planned field of study also changed for both blacks and whites between survey years. The largest increase for both races occurred in the business category, with the next largest expansion appearing in engineering. The largest decreases occurred in education and the social sciences, with the downturn being greater among blacks than whites. Black and white seniors in the middle and upper-aptitude levels were more likely to select the biological and physical sciences, engineering, and social sciences while low-aptitude seniors were more likely to choose vocational studies, health-related studies, and education.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
High school graduates -- United States -- Longitudinal studies.; African American students -- Longitudinal studies.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Grant, Arthur T.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleA COMPARISON OF POST-SECONDARY EDUCATIONAL PLANS OF BLACK AND WHITE HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS IN 1972 AND 1980.en_US
dc.creatorSMITH, MICHAEL FRANCIS.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSMITH, MICHAEL FRANCIS.en_US
dc.date.issued1982en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe educational plans of black high-school seniors over the past decade were examined and compared to the plans of white students by analyzing selected base-year data from The National Longitudinal Study of the High School Class of 1972 and High School and Beyond: A National Longitudinal Study for the 1980s. Chi-square was used to detect significant changes between survey years. Expectations to participate in post-secondary education were essentially the same for all black and white seniors between 1972 and 1980 though black expectations were greater. Among whites, women exceeded men in 1980. When levels of educational expectation were examined, significant differences were apparent for both races. Large declines occurred in the four-year college category though they were partially offset by increases in the graduate school category. Small increases also occurred among both blacks and whites in the community college category. No clear trends were seen in the vocational school category. Black expectations were greater than those of whites in the combined upper two categories with the most striking difference seen among low-aptitude and low-SES students. Immediate plans for two- or four-year college attendance changed significantly for both blacks and whites with more students indicating four-year preference in 1980. Overall, more blacks than whites planned four-year attendance in both survey years and the largest differences between races were found on the low- and middle-aptitude levels. Preferences for planned field of study also changed for both blacks and whites between survey years. The largest increase for both races occurred in the business category, with the next largest expansion appearing in engineering. The largest decreases occurred in education and the social sciences, with the downturn being greater among blacks than whites. Black and white seniors in the middle and upper-aptitude levels were more likely to select the biological and physical sciences, engineering, and social sciences while low-aptitude seniors were more likely to choose vocational studies, health-related studies, and education.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectHigh school graduates -- United States -- Longitudinal studies.en_US
dc.subjectAfrican American students -- Longitudinal studies.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorGrant, Arthur T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8217473en_US
dc.identifier.oclc681767026en_US
All Items in UA Campus Repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.