MEASURING TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS AS A RESULT OF INTENSIVE TRAINING IN THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF INSTRUCTION MODEL (MADELINE HUNTER, SUPERVISION, CLINICAL).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188013
Title:
MEASURING TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS AS A RESULT OF INTENSIVE TRAINING IN THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF INSTRUCTION MODEL (MADELINE HUNTER, SUPERVISION, CLINICAL).
Author:
SMITH, DENNIS MICHAEL.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Problem. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of elementary school teachers who had received intensive training in the Essential Elements of Instruction model, a teaching methodology composed of specific teacher behaviors. Teacher effectiveness was measured by analyzing student achievement results in reading. Procedure. Elementary teachers at specified grade levels in two selected school districts were divided into two groups: Group A, teachers who had received training in the Essential Elements of Instruction, and Group B, teachers who had not received this training. In School District I, a student population of approximately two hundred and twenty-five students was selected as the treatment group and a student population of approximately two hundred and ten students was selected as the control group. In School District II, a student population of approximately one hundred and forty-five students was selected as the treatment group and a student population of approximately one hundred and forty students was selected as the control group. The Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test (Form A-E) was used as the post test measure of achievement for all students. This test was used to determine if a teacher's training in the Essential Elements of Instruction model would result in greater student achievement gains as measured by the selected reading test. Results. The analysis of variance treatment of the data indicated that there were significant differences between the reading scores of students whose teachers had received training in the Essential Elements of Instruction model and those students whose teachers did not receive this training. Thus, the data did allow for the rejection of null Hypothesis 1. The analysis of variance treatment of the data indicated that there were no interaction effects of teacher training and student reading achievement by the grade level of the student, the socioeconomic level of the student, or the interaction of student grade level and student socioeconomic level. Thus, the data did not allow for the rejection of null Hypothesis 2, null Hypothesis 3 and null Hypothesis 4.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Elementary school teachers -- In-service training -- Evaluation.; Teachers -- Training of -- Evaluation.; Prediction of teacher success.; School improvement programs -- Evaluation.
Degree Name:
Educat.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Sacken, Donal
Committee Chair:
Nelson, Lawrence

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleMEASURING TEACHER EFFECTIVENESS AS A RESULT OF INTENSIVE TRAINING IN THE ESSENTIAL ELEMENTS OF INSTRUCTION MODEL (MADELINE HUNTER, SUPERVISION, CLINICAL).en_US
dc.creatorSMITH, DENNIS MICHAEL.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSMITH, DENNIS MICHAEL.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractProblem. The purpose of this study was to assess the effectiveness of elementary school teachers who had received intensive training in the Essential Elements of Instruction model, a teaching methodology composed of specific teacher behaviors. Teacher effectiveness was measured by analyzing student achievement results in reading. Procedure. Elementary teachers at specified grade levels in two selected school districts were divided into two groups: Group A, teachers who had received training in the Essential Elements of Instruction, and Group B, teachers who had not received this training. In School District I, a student population of approximately two hundred and twenty-five students was selected as the treatment group and a student population of approximately two hundred and ten students was selected as the control group. In School District II, a student population of approximately one hundred and forty-five students was selected as the treatment group and a student population of approximately one hundred and forty students was selected as the control group. The Gates-MacGinitie Reading Test (Form A-E) was used as the post test measure of achievement for all students. This test was used to determine if a teacher's training in the Essential Elements of Instruction model would result in greater student achievement gains as measured by the selected reading test. Results. The analysis of variance treatment of the data indicated that there were significant differences between the reading scores of students whose teachers had received training in the Essential Elements of Instruction model and those students whose teachers did not receive this training. Thus, the data did allow for the rejection of null Hypothesis 1. The analysis of variance treatment of the data indicated that there were no interaction effects of teacher training and student reading achievement by the grade level of the student, the socioeconomic level of the student, or the interaction of student grade level and student socioeconomic level. Thus, the data did not allow for the rejection of null Hypothesis 2, null Hypothesis 3 and null Hypothesis 4.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectElementary school teachers -- In-service training -- Evaluation.en_US
dc.subjectTeachers -- Training of -- Evaluation.en_US
dc.subjectPrediction of teacher success.en_US
dc.subjectSchool improvement programs -- Evaluation.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineEducationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorSacken, Donalen_US
dc.contributor.chairNelson, Lawrenceen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGose, Kennethen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRanniger, Williamen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberNash, Patricken_US
dc.identifier.proquest8522825en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696416495en_US
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