FACTORS AFFECTING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NEW EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN HIGHER EDUCATION (COMMUNITY COLLEGES).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188011
Title:
FACTORS AFFECTING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NEW EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN HIGHER EDUCATION (COMMUNITY COLLEGES).
Author:
ROARK, DENIS DAREL.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Advances in computer and video technology, coupled with their decreasing cost, have placed considerable impetus for implementation of new technology in the educational environment. While many institutions of higher education are considering implementing systems of new educational technology, the actual process of implementing change is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to attempt to gain greater insight into the implementation process. The research questions guiding this study were: (1) What are the factors associated with the implementation of new educational technology at community colleges? (2) Who are the change agents associated with the implementaon of new educational technology at community colleges? The case study methodology was selected as the most appropriate technique for this study because: (1) research involving the implementation stage of the change process has been limited; (2) the change process does not have a single theoretical basis for conducting empirical testing; and (3) the complexity of the subject being investigated. Three community colleges in the southwestern United States, which have recently completed the implementation of an innovation, were selected for the case study research. The innovation under investigation at Vernon Regional Junior College was the implementation of a microcomputer system. The subject of investigation at Dona Ana Branch Community College was the implementation of equipment to support a word processing program. The implementation of an instructional television program was studied at New Mexico Junior College. Seven factors emerged as common to all three institutions as they implemented innovation. The seven common factors were: (1) the availability of funds outside the normal operating budget to finance implementation of innovation; (2) elimination of boundary contraction; (3) individuals affected by the innovation had input into the implementation process; (4) clear channels of communication existed among those involved in the implementation process; (5) the hierarchy involved in the approval process was limited; (6) the administration supported plans to implement the innovation; and (7) measures were taken to reduce resistance to the innovation. Change agents were found to be a necessary catalyst for change and can emerge from any level of governance.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Educational innovations.; Educational technology.; Community colleges -- New Mexico.
Degree Name:
Educat.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Conrad, Clifton

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleFACTORS AFFECTING THE IMPLEMENTATION OF NEW EDUCATIONAL TECHNOLOGY IN HIGHER EDUCATION (COMMUNITY COLLEGES).en_US
dc.creatorROARK, DENIS DAREL.en_US
dc.contributor.authorROARK, DENIS DAREL.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractAdvances in computer and video technology, coupled with their decreasing cost, have placed considerable impetus for implementation of new technology in the educational environment. While many institutions of higher education are considering implementing systems of new educational technology, the actual process of implementing change is not well understood. The purpose of this study was to attempt to gain greater insight into the implementation process. The research questions guiding this study were: (1) What are the factors associated with the implementation of new educational technology at community colleges? (2) Who are the change agents associated with the implementaon of new educational technology at community colleges? The case study methodology was selected as the most appropriate technique for this study because: (1) research involving the implementation stage of the change process has been limited; (2) the change process does not have a single theoretical basis for conducting empirical testing; and (3) the complexity of the subject being investigated. Three community colleges in the southwestern United States, which have recently completed the implementation of an innovation, were selected for the case study research. The innovation under investigation at Vernon Regional Junior College was the implementation of a microcomputer system. The subject of investigation at Dona Ana Branch Community College was the implementation of equipment to support a word processing program. The implementation of an instructional television program was studied at New Mexico Junior College. Seven factors emerged as common to all three institutions as they implemented innovation. The seven common factors were: (1) the availability of funds outside the normal operating budget to finance implementation of innovation; (2) elimination of boundary contraction; (3) individuals affected by the innovation had input into the implementation process; (4) clear channels of communication existed among those involved in the implementation process; (5) the hierarchy involved in the approval process was limited; (6) the administration supported plans to implement the innovation; and (7) measures were taken to reduce resistance to the innovation. Change agents were found to be a necessary catalyst for change and can emerge from any level of governance.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectEducational innovations.en_US
dc.subjectEducational technology.en_US
dc.subjectCommunity colleges -- New Mexico.en_US
thesis.degree.nameEducat.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorConrad, Cliftonen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGothberg, Helenen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberPaulsen, Roberten_US
dc.identifier.proquest8522822en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696411207en_US
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