EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND APPLIED GROWTH REGULATORS ON GROWTH, CYTOKININ PRODUCTION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES OF PEPPERS (CAPSICUM ANNUUM L.) (ARIZONA).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/188004
Title:
EFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND APPLIED GROWTH REGULATORS ON GROWTH, CYTOKININ PRODUCTION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES OF PEPPERS (CAPSICUM ANNUUM L.) (ARIZONA).
Author:
LAIBI, SAMI RESHAK.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Pepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) were grown in field and a greenhouse in Arizona to determine the effects of water stress, root temperature, and exogenously applied growth regulators on cytokinin production and the resulting growth. Research showed that vegetative plants were significantly higher in cytokinin activity and growth parameters than fruiting plants. Also, in root-pruned fruiting plants, cytokinin activity was less than that of intact fruiting plants. In vegetative plants, the competition between removed sinks and the rest of the shoot was reduced and, hence, more cytokinin came from the roots to the shoots. Besides, additional carbohydrates were available and recycled to the roots. In respect to temperature effect, elevating temperature from 15 to 30°C had a pronounced effect of increasing the growth rate and cytokinin activity. The measured parameters declined when temperature exceeded 30°C. Temperatures between 25 and 30°C were found to be optimum. Under experimental conditions, growth regulators (Cytex® and Burst®) applied to the soil or foliage had no significant effect on growth rates or cytokinin activity in roots. Also, applying Burst® or kinetin to the nutrient medium had inconsistent and statistically nonsignificant effects on photosynthesis and transpiration.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Roots (Botany) -- Physiology.; Plants -- Effect of heat on.; Plant regulators.; Cytokinins.; Peppers.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Oebker, Norman F.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleEFFECT OF ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AND APPLIED GROWTH REGULATORS ON GROWTH, CYTOKININ PRODUCTION AND PHYSIOLOGICAL CHANGES OF PEPPERS (CAPSICUM ANNUUM L.) (ARIZONA).en_US
dc.creatorLAIBI, SAMI RESHAK.en_US
dc.contributor.authorLAIBI, SAMI RESHAK.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPepper plants (Capsicum annuum L.) were grown in field and a greenhouse in Arizona to determine the effects of water stress, root temperature, and exogenously applied growth regulators on cytokinin production and the resulting growth. Research showed that vegetative plants were significantly higher in cytokinin activity and growth parameters than fruiting plants. Also, in root-pruned fruiting plants, cytokinin activity was less than that of intact fruiting plants. In vegetative plants, the competition between removed sinks and the rest of the shoot was reduced and, hence, more cytokinin came from the roots to the shoots. Besides, additional carbohydrates were available and recycled to the roots. In respect to temperature effect, elevating temperature from 15 to 30°C had a pronounced effect of increasing the growth rate and cytokinin activity. The measured parameters declined when temperature exceeded 30°C. Temperatures between 25 and 30°C were found to be optimum. Under experimental conditions, growth regulators (Cytex® and Burst®) applied to the soil or foliage had no significant effect on growth rates or cytokinin activity in roots. Also, applying Burst® or kinetin to the nutrient medium had inconsistent and statistically nonsignificant effects on photosynthesis and transpiration.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRoots (Botany) -- Physiology.en_US
dc.subjectPlants -- Effect of heat on.en_US
dc.subjectPlant regulators.en_US
dc.subjectCytokinins.en_US
dc.subjectPeppers.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorOebker, Norman F.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBessey, Paul M.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBartels, Paul G.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, Robert E.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8522815en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696620389en_US
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