HERITABILITY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF DROUGHT TOLERANCE IN SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR (L.) MOENCH).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187991
Title:
HERITABILITY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF DROUGHT TOLERANCE IN SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR (L.) MOENCH).
Author:
AGBARY, ABDUL WALLY.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
Physiological responses of 12 sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) genotypes previously classified as drought resistant and susceptible upon grain yield basis were evaluated under dry and wet moisture treatments at Tucson, Arizona in 1983. In addition, the relationship of these physiological responses and their heritability estimates were also determined. Apparent photosynthesis, transpiration, diffusive resistance, temperature differentials, and leaf temperature were measured under field conditions at three intervals from planting date: 48, 62, and 77 days, respectively. Stomatal density and epicuticular wax content were determined toward the end of the season when full canopy development was reached. Stress significantly affected all characteristics measured for each genotype by a reduction in apparent photosynthesis rates, transpiration, and temperature differentials, and an increase in diffusive resistance, leaf temperature and stomatal density. The wax content response varied among genotypes irrespective of the dry and wet moisture treatments. Except for the wax content and stomatal density, all the other parameters demonstrated a high significant correlation with photosynthesis at .001 level; nevertheless, greater values were observed in the stress treatment. Analysis of variance failed to detect significant differences among the 12 germplasm sources, except for the stomatal density. Multiple regression analysis showed that leaf diffusive resistance was the first variable incorporated for photosynthesis prediction in both the dry and wet treatments. The offspring and mid-parent regression for each characteristic under both treatments provided heritability estimates (h('2) (+OR-) SE), indicating higher heritability values under the dry treatment.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Sorghum -- Drought tolerance.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Plant Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Voigt, R. L.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleHERITABILITY AND PHYSIOLOGY OF DROUGHT TOLERANCE IN SORGHUM (SORGHUM BICOLOR (L.) MOENCH).en_US
dc.creatorAGBARY, ABDUL WALLY.en_US
dc.contributor.authorAGBARY, ABDUL WALLY.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractPhysiological responses of 12 sorghum (Sorghum bicolor L.) genotypes previously classified as drought resistant and susceptible upon grain yield basis were evaluated under dry and wet moisture treatments at Tucson, Arizona in 1983. In addition, the relationship of these physiological responses and their heritability estimates were also determined. Apparent photosynthesis, transpiration, diffusive resistance, temperature differentials, and leaf temperature were measured under field conditions at three intervals from planting date: 48, 62, and 77 days, respectively. Stomatal density and epicuticular wax content were determined toward the end of the season when full canopy development was reached. Stress significantly affected all characteristics measured for each genotype by a reduction in apparent photosynthesis rates, transpiration, and temperature differentials, and an increase in diffusive resistance, leaf temperature and stomatal density. The wax content response varied among genotypes irrespective of the dry and wet moisture treatments. Except for the wax content and stomatal density, all the other parameters demonstrated a high significant correlation with photosynthesis at .001 level; nevertheless, greater values were observed in the stress treatment. Analysis of variance failed to detect significant differences among the 12 germplasm sources, except for the stomatal density. Multiple regression analysis showed that leaf diffusive resistance was the first variable incorporated for photosynthesis prediction in both the dry and wet treatments. The offspring and mid-parent regression for each characteristic under both treatments provided heritability estimates (h('2) (+OR-) SE), indicating higher heritability values under the dry treatment.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectSorghum -- Drought tolerance.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplinePlant Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorVoigt, R. L.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberDobrenz, A. K.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGathman, A. C.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBriggs, R. E.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberMarcarian, Victoriaen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberRay, D. T.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8522802en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696420401en_US
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