ROCKBOLT ANALYSIS FOR REINFORCEMENT AND DESIGN IN LAYERED ROCK (COMPOSITE).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187982
Title:
ROCKBOLT ANALYSIS FOR REINFORCEMENT AND DESIGN IN LAYERED ROCK (COMPOSITE).
Author:
JEFFREY, ROBERT GRAHAM, JR.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The displacements and stresses in layered rock above underground openings can be calculated using a beam model for the rock layers. The traditional approach assumes that interfaces between layers are frictionless and layers can slip past one another freely as they deflect. In contrast, the design of structural laminated beams has traditionally been based on the assumption that the interfaces between layers were welded, with no slip occurring there. In this work, the theory of composite laminated beams, which allows for partial slip on layer interfaces, is applied to the problem of predicting displacements and stresses in layered roof rock. The effects of rockbolt reinforcement are modeled by discrete shear and normal stiffnesses incorporated at locations in the model where the rockbolts cross layer interfaces. Published solutions and results for laminated composite beams are reviewed. Composite laminated beam theory provided a means of accounting for rockbolt reinforcement effects and provided a conceptual framework that was used to develop two FORTRAN programs; one, based on the force method of analysis, that automatically finds shear and tensile interface failures in the system, and the other a finite element program that employs beam elements, elastic interface elements, and rockbolt elements to model a rockbolted layered rock system. Published data together with results from these programs suggest that shear reinforcement may be more effective when placed near the ends of roof layers. The normal interaction between layers tends to be uniformly distributed unless rockbolt forces act on the layers or if partial delamination of layers has occurred. Both shear and normal reinforcement will cause stresses to be redistributed within the system of layers. Analysis of this redistribution of stresses requires that the sequence of interface failure be predicted which, in turn, requires that the properties of the individual layers, of the interfaces between layers, and of the rockbolts be properly taken into account. Laminated composite beam theory and programs based on this theory provide rational and efficient ways to study and analyze the behavior of layered roof rock.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Rock mechanics.; Strains and stresses.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Mining and Geological Engineering; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Daemen, Jaak J. K.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleROCKBOLT ANALYSIS FOR REINFORCEMENT AND DESIGN IN LAYERED ROCK (COMPOSITE).en_US
dc.creatorJEFFREY, ROBERT GRAHAM, JR.en_US
dc.contributor.authorJEFFREY, ROBERT GRAHAM, JR.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe displacements and stresses in layered rock above underground openings can be calculated using a beam model for the rock layers. The traditional approach assumes that interfaces between layers are frictionless and layers can slip past one another freely as they deflect. In contrast, the design of structural laminated beams has traditionally been based on the assumption that the interfaces between layers were welded, with no slip occurring there. In this work, the theory of composite laminated beams, which allows for partial slip on layer interfaces, is applied to the problem of predicting displacements and stresses in layered roof rock. The effects of rockbolt reinforcement are modeled by discrete shear and normal stiffnesses incorporated at locations in the model where the rockbolts cross layer interfaces. Published solutions and results for laminated composite beams are reviewed. Composite laminated beam theory provided a means of accounting for rockbolt reinforcement effects and provided a conceptual framework that was used to develop two FORTRAN programs; one, based on the force method of analysis, that automatically finds shear and tensile interface failures in the system, and the other a finite element program that employs beam elements, elastic interface elements, and rockbolt elements to model a rockbolted layered rock system. Published data together with results from these programs suggest that shear reinforcement may be more effective when placed near the ends of roof layers. The normal interaction between layers tends to be uniformly distributed unless rockbolt forces act on the layers or if partial delamination of layers has occurred. Both shear and normal reinforcement will cause stresses to be redistributed within the system of layers. Analysis of this redistribution of stresses requires that the sequence of interface failure be predicted which, in turn, requires that the properties of the individual layers, of the interfaces between layers, and of the rockbolts be properly taken into account. Laminated composite beam theory and programs based on this theory provide rational and efficient ways to study and analyze the behavior of layered roof rock.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectRock mechanics.en_US
dc.subjectStrains and stresses.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineMining and Geological Engineeringen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDaemen, Jaak J. K.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8517499en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696379435en_US
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