THE EFFECTS OF EXPRESSIVE RELEASE THERAPY UPON THE PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS PATIENTS.

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187977
Title:
THE EFFECTS OF EXPRESSIVE RELEASE THERAPY UPON THE PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS PATIENTS.
Author:
ENGLE, DAVID EUGENE.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
This study was designed to assess the effects of Expressive Release Therapy upon the physical and psychosocial aspects of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It was anticipated that the release of constricted emotion, particularly anger, might produce (1) reductions in the severity of and amount of time in pain, (2) improved musculoskeletal functioning, and (3) improved psychological functioning. Six women, aged 26-68, with RA in active II or III participated in this A-B with follow-up replicated design. Pain levels were reported on visual analogues; musculoskeletal examinations were conduced by a rheumatology technician; morning stiffness and daily functioning were assessed by self-report instruments. Erythrocyte sedimentation rates used the Westergren method of analysis. Psychosocial functioning was assessed by the degression and hostility scales of the SCL-90, and Eysenck Personality Inventory and the Katz Adjustment Scale. The design consisted of a four week baseline control, a ten week treatment, and a four week follow-up period. Results were analyzed by visual analysis, Friedman analysis of variance, Pearson product moment correlations and Wilcoxon signed rank W tests. A significance level of .05 was selected and a criteria for "meaningful change" was established at ± .5 SE(m). Visual analysis revealed that pain levels tended to be lower at post-session across all but the baseline phase. Treatment failed to produce a significant effect on pain and on musculoskeletal functioning, morning stiffness, daily functioning, and erythrocyte sedimentation rates. Treatment failed to produce significant effects on psychosocial functioning. However, "possibly meaningful changes" were found in all three psychosocial measures. The study did find support for the contention that the constriction of hostile affect is positively related to the severity of pain. The findings of the study lend support to the effectiveness of Expressive Release Therapy as a means to enhance the coping strategies of RA patients.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Counseling and Guidance; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Daldrup, Roger

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleTHE EFFECTS OF EXPRESSIVE RELEASE THERAPY UPON THE PHYSICAL AND PSYCHOLOGICAL WELL-BEING OF RHEUMATOID ARTHRITIS PATIENTS.en_US
dc.creatorENGLE, DAVID EUGENE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorENGLE, DAVID EUGENE.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThis study was designed to assess the effects of Expressive Release Therapy upon the physical and psychosocial aspects of patients with rheumatoid arthritis. It was anticipated that the release of constricted emotion, particularly anger, might produce (1) reductions in the severity of and amount of time in pain, (2) improved musculoskeletal functioning, and (3) improved psychological functioning. Six women, aged 26-68, with RA in active II or III participated in this A-B with follow-up replicated design. Pain levels were reported on visual analogues; musculoskeletal examinations were conduced by a rheumatology technician; morning stiffness and daily functioning were assessed by self-report instruments. Erythrocyte sedimentation rates used the Westergren method of analysis. Psychosocial functioning was assessed by the degression and hostility scales of the SCL-90, and Eysenck Personality Inventory and the Katz Adjustment Scale. The design consisted of a four week baseline control, a ten week treatment, and a four week follow-up period. Results were analyzed by visual analysis, Friedman analysis of variance, Pearson product moment correlations and Wilcoxon signed rank W tests. A significance level of .05 was selected and a criteria for "meaningful change" was established at ± .5 SE(m). Visual analysis revealed that pain levels tended to be lower at post-session across all but the baseline phase. Treatment failed to produce a significant effect on pain and on musculoskeletal functioning, morning stiffness, daily functioning, and erythrocyte sedimentation rates. Treatment failed to produce significant effects on psychosocial functioning. However, "possibly meaningful changes" were found in all three psychosocial measures. The study did find support for the contention that the constriction of hostile affect is positively related to the severity of pain. The findings of the study lend support to the effectiveness of Expressive Release Therapy as a means to enhance the coping strategies of RA patients.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineCounseling and Guidanceen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorDaldrup, Rogeren_US
dc.identifier.proquest8517495en_US
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