INTERACTION AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF TRACE MINERALS WITH CEREAL BRANS (FIBER, COPPER).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187963
Title:
INTERACTION AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF TRACE MINERALS WITH CEREAL BRANS (FIBER, COPPER).
Author:
ROCKWAY, SUSIE WILSON.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The ability of wheat bran and oat hulls to bind copper and zinc using a new chromatographic technique was investigated and compared to a centrifugation method. Also investigated was the bioavailability of copper which had been exogenously bound to wheat bran then fed to mice and rats. Wheat bran bound 6 mg Cu/g fiber when pH was raised to 7. Less binding occurred at lower pHs. Seven mg of zinc bound to wheat bran at pH 5 while only a trace bound at pH less than 2. Oat hulls bound 3 mg Cu/g fiber at pH 5, and less than 1 mg of zinc bound per g of oat hull at pH 6. Binding for both fibers depended on the level of mineral added to the fiber slurry during incubation. But only wheat bran binding capacity was influenced by pH. The two methods used did not compare favorably, in all cases, to the amount of mineral bound to fiber. Copper when bound to wheat bran, was utilized in both species, with differences occurring between species was noted. Rats fed the copper bound diet compared favorably with rats fed the copper-adequate diet as determined by body weight, weight gain, heart weight, liver copper concentration and heart copper concentration. Mice, on the other hand showed similar liver and heart concentrations of copper for mice fed either the copper-bound diet or the copper-adequate diets. The in vitro results showed that binding of copper or zinc to wheat bran occurred at a pH similar to the intestinal pH and wheat bran binds more copper and zinc than oat hulls. Oat hulls may prove to be a better dietary fiber source for those people who need to increase their dietary fiber, because oat hulls do not appear to bind copper or zinc and would not likely impair their absorption. Although wheat bran had a high binding capacity for copper, this binding did not significantly inhibit copper absorption as determined in animal studies suggesting that fiber-mineral binding (at least for copper bound to wheat bran) does not cause mineral deficiency symptoms as claimed by many researchers.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Fiber in human nutrition.; Trace elements in nutrition.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Nutritional Sciences; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Weber, Charles W.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleINTERACTION AND BIOAVAILABILITY OF TRACE MINERALS WITH CEREAL BRANS (FIBER, COPPER).en_US
dc.creatorROCKWAY, SUSIE WILSON.en_US
dc.contributor.authorROCKWAY, SUSIE WILSON.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe ability of wheat bran and oat hulls to bind copper and zinc using a new chromatographic technique was investigated and compared to a centrifugation method. Also investigated was the bioavailability of copper which had been exogenously bound to wheat bran then fed to mice and rats. Wheat bran bound 6 mg Cu/g fiber when pH was raised to 7. Less binding occurred at lower pHs. Seven mg of zinc bound to wheat bran at pH 5 while only a trace bound at pH less than 2. Oat hulls bound 3 mg Cu/g fiber at pH 5, and less than 1 mg of zinc bound per g of oat hull at pH 6. Binding for both fibers depended on the level of mineral added to the fiber slurry during incubation. But only wheat bran binding capacity was influenced by pH. The two methods used did not compare favorably, in all cases, to the amount of mineral bound to fiber. Copper when bound to wheat bran, was utilized in both species, with differences occurring between species was noted. Rats fed the copper bound diet compared favorably with rats fed the copper-adequate diet as determined by body weight, weight gain, heart weight, liver copper concentration and heart copper concentration. Mice, on the other hand showed similar liver and heart concentrations of copper for mice fed either the copper-bound diet or the copper-adequate diets. The in vitro results showed that binding of copper or zinc to wheat bran occurred at a pH similar to the intestinal pH and wheat bran binds more copper and zinc than oat hulls. Oat hulls may prove to be a better dietary fiber source for those people who need to increase their dietary fiber, because oat hulls do not appear to bind copper or zinc and would not likely impair their absorption. Although wheat bran had a high binding capacity for copper, this binding did not significantly inhibit copper absorption as determined in animal studies suggesting that fiber-mineral binding (at least for copper bound to wheat bran) does not cause mineral deficiency symptoms as claimed by many researchers.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFiber in human nutrition.en_US
dc.subjectTrace elements in nutrition.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineNutritional Sciencesen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorWeber, Charles W.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberBerry, Jamesen_US
dc.contributor.committeememberLei, Daviden_US
dc.identifier.proquest8514921en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696361832en_US
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