SERUM FREE FATTY ACID CONCENTRATION DURING POST-EXERCISE RECOVERY (INSULIN, HUNGER).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187956
Title:
SERUM FREE FATTY ACID CONCENTRATION DURING POST-EXERCISE RECOVERY (INSULIN, HUNGER).
Author:
MAXWELL, BESS DEVERE.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
In order to achieve a better understanding of the impact of exercise on the concentration of serum free fatty acids (FFA) during post-exercise recovery, the purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the relationships between exercise intensity, total exercise energy expenditure, and the concentration of serum FFA during post-exercise recovery; (2) to examine the effects of exoge- nous glucose on post-exercise serum FFA and hormones controlling the FFA response; and (3) to examine the impact of acute exercise on hunger. Untrained, 12-h fasted, college-age males performed cycle ergometer exercise at exercise intensities ranging from 29 to 59% peak ‘VO₂ for total energy expenditures ranging from 162 to 320 kcal. Blood samples, hunger ratings, and metabolic indices were collected or measured before, during, and for 3 h post-exercise. In response to exercise of approximately 300 kcal, FFA was elevated for 3 h post-exercise. The FFA response was a function of total exercise energy expenditure, rather than exercise intensity, or combined effects of these factors. The response was associated with low insulin concentration but no changes were observed in blood glucose, glucagon, growth hormone, or cortisol. Glucose ingestion and infusion studies demonstrated that possible mechanisms con- tributing to the post-exercise FFA response included decreases in FFA re-esterification, increases in triglyceride hydrolysis, and decreases in sympathetic input to adipose tissue. Exercise caused a suppression of hunger for 2 h post-exercise which was a function of the combined effects of exercise intensity and total energy expenditure. An increase in core temperature may have contributed to the anorexigenic effect of exercise. In conclusion, exercise, performed in and followed by a period of fasting caused an elevation of FFA for 3 h during post-exercise recovery. The post-exercise recovery period should be considered an important phase in the physiological impact of exercise on the storage and utilization of fat.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Fatty acids -- Metabolism.; Exercise -- Physiological aspects.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Animal Physiology; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Convertino, Victor A.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleSERUM FREE FATTY ACID CONCENTRATION DURING POST-EXERCISE RECOVERY (INSULIN, HUNGER).en_US
dc.creatorMAXWELL, BESS DEVERE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMAXWELL, BESS DEVERE.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractIn order to achieve a better understanding of the impact of exercise on the concentration of serum free fatty acids (FFA) during post-exercise recovery, the purposes of this study were: (1) to determine the relationships between exercise intensity, total exercise energy expenditure, and the concentration of serum FFA during post-exercise recovery; (2) to examine the effects of exoge- nous glucose on post-exercise serum FFA and hormones controlling the FFA response; and (3) to examine the impact of acute exercise on hunger. Untrained, 12-h fasted, college-age males performed cycle ergometer exercise at exercise intensities ranging from 29 to 59% peak ‘VO₂ for total energy expenditures ranging from 162 to 320 kcal. Blood samples, hunger ratings, and metabolic indices were collected or measured before, during, and for 3 h post-exercise. In response to exercise of approximately 300 kcal, FFA was elevated for 3 h post-exercise. The FFA response was a function of total exercise energy expenditure, rather than exercise intensity, or combined effects of these factors. The response was associated with low insulin concentration but no changes were observed in blood glucose, glucagon, growth hormone, or cortisol. Glucose ingestion and infusion studies demonstrated that possible mechanisms con- tributing to the post-exercise FFA response included decreases in FFA re-esterification, increases in triglyceride hydrolysis, and decreases in sympathetic input to adipose tissue. Exercise caused a suppression of hunger for 2 h post-exercise which was a function of the combined effects of exercise intensity and total energy expenditure. An increase in core temperature may have contributed to the anorexigenic effect of exercise. In conclusion, exercise, performed in and followed by a period of fasting caused an elevation of FFA for 3 h during post-exercise recovery. The post-exercise recovery period should be considered an important phase in the physiological impact of exercise on the storage and utilization of fat.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectFatty acids -- Metabolism.en_US
dc.subjectExercise -- Physiological aspects.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineAnimal Physiologyen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorConvertino, Victor A.en_US
dc.identifier.proquest8514915en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696341986en_US
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