LIBERAL EDUCATION SKILLS IN THE FIELD OF NURSING (GENERAL, NON-TECHNICAL).

Persistent Link:
http://hdl.handle.net/10150/187948
Title:
LIBERAL EDUCATION SKILLS IN THE FIELD OF NURSING (GENERAL, NON-TECHNICAL).
Author:
EHRAT, KAREN SUE.
Issue Date:
1985
Publisher:
The University of Arizona.
Rights:
Copyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.
Abstract:
The primary purpose of the study was to identify liberal education skills necessary for competent, professional nursing practice and to compare baccalaureate and associate degree faculties' perceptions of the importance of liberal education skills and program emphasis on those skills. Further, the study sought to identify underlying factors of liberal education skills perceived by college nursing faculty to be required for competent, professional nursing practice. Finally, the study attempted to identify differences in baccalaureate and associate degree faculties' perceptions of the importance of liberal education skills and program emphasis place on those skills by public and private institutional membership and by National League for Nursing (NLN) geographic accrediting region assignment. The study's survey approach could be classified as a quasi-experimental design. The study utilized a multistage, stratified sample of 432 baccalaureate and associate degree nursing faculty. Seventy-two baccalaureate and 72 associate degree nursing programs were randomly selected from the four NLN geographic regions. Each dean or director of selected programs was requested to select three nursing faculty "most knowledgeable of the nursing curriculum" to complete the instrument. Data for the study were collected by means of the "Liberal Education Skills Inventory for Nursing" (LESIN). Data analysis was accomplished through the use of descriptive statistics, principal factors analysis, and analysis of variance. Major conclusions of the study were (1) nine of the ten LESIN subscales had mean faculty ratings suggesting high skill importance to competent, professional nursing practice; (2) one factor ("conceptual abilities") underlying faculty perceptions of liberal education skills importance was extracted; (3) there were statistically significant differences in baccalaureate and associate degree faculties' perceptions regarding skills importance on two of the LESIN subscales and regarding program emphasis on five of the subscales; (4) on each of the ten LESIN subscales, faculty from public and private institutions did not differ significantly on their perceptions of skills importance and did differ significantly on one subscale regarding program emphasis; and (5) the mean skill importance and program emphasis responses of faculty did not differ significantly on the ten LESIN subscales by NLN geographic accrediting region assignment. In addition, information regarding liberal education skills program evaluation measures or standards was reported.
Type:
text; Dissertation-Reproduction (electronic)
Keywords:
Nursing schools -- United States.; Nursing -- Study and teaching -- United States.; Nursing schools -- Administration.
Degree Name:
Ph.D.
Degree Level:
doctoral
Degree Program:
Higher Education; Graduate College
Degree Grantor:
University of Arizona
Advisor:
Paulsen, F. Robert

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.language.isoenen_US
dc.titleLIBERAL EDUCATION SKILLS IN THE FIELD OF NURSING (GENERAL, NON-TECHNICAL).en_US
dc.creatorEHRAT, KAREN SUE.en_US
dc.contributor.authorEHRAT, KAREN SUE.en_US
dc.date.issued1985en_US
dc.publisherThe University of Arizona.en_US
dc.rightsCopyright © is held by the author. Digital access to this material is made possible by the University Libraries, University of Arizona. Further transmission, reproduction or presentation (such as public display or performance) of protected items is prohibited except with permission of the author.en_US
dc.description.abstractThe primary purpose of the study was to identify liberal education skills necessary for competent, professional nursing practice and to compare baccalaureate and associate degree faculties' perceptions of the importance of liberal education skills and program emphasis on those skills. Further, the study sought to identify underlying factors of liberal education skills perceived by college nursing faculty to be required for competent, professional nursing practice. Finally, the study attempted to identify differences in baccalaureate and associate degree faculties' perceptions of the importance of liberal education skills and program emphasis place on those skills by public and private institutional membership and by National League for Nursing (NLN) geographic accrediting region assignment. The study's survey approach could be classified as a quasi-experimental design. The study utilized a multistage, stratified sample of 432 baccalaureate and associate degree nursing faculty. Seventy-two baccalaureate and 72 associate degree nursing programs were randomly selected from the four NLN geographic regions. Each dean or director of selected programs was requested to select three nursing faculty "most knowledgeable of the nursing curriculum" to complete the instrument. Data for the study were collected by means of the "Liberal Education Skills Inventory for Nursing" (LESIN). Data analysis was accomplished through the use of descriptive statistics, principal factors analysis, and analysis of variance. Major conclusions of the study were (1) nine of the ten LESIN subscales had mean faculty ratings suggesting high skill importance to competent, professional nursing practice; (2) one factor ("conceptual abilities") underlying faculty perceptions of liberal education skills importance was extracted; (3) there were statistically significant differences in baccalaureate and associate degree faculties' perceptions regarding skills importance on two of the LESIN subscales and regarding program emphasis on five of the subscales; (4) on each of the ten LESIN subscales, faculty from public and private institutions did not differ significantly on their perceptions of skills importance and did differ significantly on one subscale regarding program emphasis; and (5) the mean skill importance and program emphasis responses of faculty did not differ significantly on the ten LESIN subscales by NLN geographic accrediting region assignment. In addition, information regarding liberal education skills program evaluation measures or standards was reported.en_US
dc.typetexten_US
dc.typeDissertation-Reproduction (electronic)en_US
dc.subjectNursing schools -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectNursing -- Study and teaching -- United States.en_US
dc.subjectNursing schools -- Administration.en_US
thesis.degree.namePh.D.en_US
thesis.degree.leveldoctoralen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineHigher Educationen_US
thesis.degree.disciplineGraduate Collegeen_US
thesis.degree.grantorUniversity of Arizonaen_US
dc.contributor.advisorPaulsen, F. Roberten_US
dc.contributor.committeememberGrant, Arthur T.en_US
dc.contributor.committeememberHinshaw, Sueen_US
dc.identifier.proquest8514906en_US
dc.identifier.oclc696332626en_US
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